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Audacious Hospitality

White hands holding a sign that reads SILENCE IS BETRAYAL

Here are eight ways that white and white-passing Reform Jews, especially, can act now in pursuit of social justice, both directly on a systemic level. These includes advocacy for policy change and for confronting racism within our own communities, and are guided by contributions and feedback from Jews of Color.

Rabbi Jonah Dov Pesner
Collage of four Black individuals holding signs that say EQUAL

As fulfilling as it was to engage in Shavuot programs, a lot weighs on me. With COVID-19 continuing to ravage Black communities and racist violence all over the news, I almost feel like it’s Yom Kippur instead – the time when Jews are supposed to be most aware of their own mortality.

Chris Harrison
Rainbow colored sound waves between two earbuds

This summer, just in time for Pride Month, ReformJudaism.org is proudly releasing season two of Wholly Jewish, which will focus on members of the Jewish LGBTQ+ community. 

Chris Harrison
Cantor David Berger smiling and strumming a guitar

Meet Cantor David Berger, the cantor at Chicago’s KAM Isaiah Israel and ReformJudaism.org’s current Ten Minutes of Torah commentator for the Book of Leviticus.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Amanda Ryan rests her chin her her hand and smiles behind a fully lit menorah

A number of things have helped me get to a place where I felt more accepting of my own identities and able to take shame and doubt and transform them into strength and courage.

Amanda Ryan
Colorful paper cutouts depicting a group of people

I am Black, I am Jewish, and I am a lesbian, among other things – and I am all of those things at all times in every context; not parts that intersect, but a whole person who fits into different worlds and spaces.

Everlyn A. Hunter
Rainbow over a body of water

When we can’t be Moses or Esther or whomever we want to be like, it’s OK – it’s necessary, even – to be Noah. Being “good enough” may not have the same glamor as leading an entire people to the Promised Land, but do you know what being “good enough” accomplished? In Noah’s case, it meant being trusted by the Holy Blessed One to literally start the entire world from scratch.

Chris Harrison
Lulav and etrog against a bright blue background

While all Jewish holidays serve as great opportunities to practice audacious hospitality, Sukkot has always stood out to me as the most audaciousl

Chris Harrison
Hands holding up a white cutout of a speech bubble with a heart on it

These questions are intended to honor all of us by helping to identify and acknowledge our missteps so that we may, ultimately, do better going forward. Additionally, celebrating our successes empowers us to move closer to the diverse, equitable, and inclusive communities we seek to build.

Chris Harrison
Closeup of a couple of unidentifiable genders holding hands

Created to commemorate the day that peace was restored between the Jewish tribes, allowing women to marry men from different tribes, many see Tu B’Av as symbolizing the freedom to love without prejudice. 

Chris Harrison and Mo Selkirk

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