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Closeup of a seder plate and a table setting

Each year on Passover, we ask “Mah nishtanah,” “Why is this night different?” This year, though, we know why: Pesach 5780 is simply unlike any other.

Rabbi Rick Jacobs
White headphones around a plastic heart against a bright blue background

For many of us, words seem inadequate to describe how we are feeling at this very moment. It is music that can carry us, support us, and hold out the possibility of hope and a better future.

Rabbi Esther Lederman
Woman holding a mug and looking out a large window during sunrise

In recent weeks, we have found ourselves on a journey for which we have felt totally unprepared. Like our ancestors, we lack maps and familiar signposts (though we do have Zoom!) to help us get oriented in our new reality.

Rabbi Nancy H. Wiener, DMin
Seder table with more than a dozen place settings

During this surreal period, many of us are trying hard to keep sadness and anxiety at bay, and that’s important. It's equally important, though, to remain connected to our feelings. Each of us is giving up so many things this year – and for me, the hardest thing to lose is our Passover seder.

Margie Bogdanow
Sunset over a calm body of water

Our ancestors turned to that pillar for strength and support in their time of waiting; so too, can we turn for help in these unprecedented times. Here is a prayer that might be recited as we light the Shabbat candles.

Rabbi Leah Doberne-Schor
Closeup of a hand strumming a guitar

This song provides us with a musical roadmap: Give fear room to process, but do not let it take root; humbly accept the unnatural and urgent circumstances before us; and then, put one foot in front of the other, sing with gusto, and digitally embrace your people.

Rabbi Alex Kress
Somber male doctor looking over his shoulder while wearing scrubs and a face mask

I run the Squirrel Hill Health Center, a nonprofit federally funded community health center in Pittsburgh. Many people have asked me what it feels like in the trenches. The answer? We feel very much alone.

Susan Friedberg Kalson
Silver Star of David and hamsa charm

I’ve highlighted some poets and poems that speak to me for the moment we are in, but I encourage you, too, to poke around on your own from among Israeli writers and find what resonates with you.

Rabbi Reuven Greenvald
Home office setup with a Shabbat scene displayed on screen

Instead of walking into Beth David’s sanctuary and settling into the wooden pews, my husband and I perched next to each other in front of my MacBook Air and logged onto Zoom, a video conferencing tool.

Helene Cohen Bludman
Hand sunder a stream of water as if begin washed

As quarantines and lockdowns spread, the descriptions of tzara-at in Leviticus 13 (Parashat Tazria-M'tzora) come to mind. Tzara-at refers to a scaly skin affliction that caused people to sent "outside of the camp" into quarantine so they wouldn't spread tzara-at to others.

Cantor Abbe Lyons

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