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environment

Smokey forest scene after wildfire

When a wildfire leveled my home when I was 20, I fell into a deep depression. Later, when I began to re-engage, I started to associate my emergence with Tu BiShvat.

Juliette Hirt
Protest sign reading CLIMATE CHANGE IS OUR OBLIGATION

Here are some ways that you, as an individual, can engage in climate change mitigation.

    Joan Rachlin
    Two birds soaring in a bright blue sky with clouds and sunshine in the background

    It’s wonderful and deep that on Yom Kippur, the section of the Torah read in many Reform congregations commands us to choose life. How, exactly, does one choose life?

    Rabbi David Seidenberg
    Large beehive in the branches of a leafy tree

    Like the Israelites in the desert, honeybees also seek new homes with everything they need to grow and thrive. Learn what else they have in common with the Israelites.

    Jane Tausig
    Tree as seen from below

    In college, being outdoors and celebrating the natural world was an important part of my spirituality, so I sought out hints that other Jews felt the same way.

    Rabbi Daniel Swartz
    Arms hugging the trunk of a tree with the hands coming together to form a heart shape in front of it

    May each of us, at this Tu BiShvat – the New Year of the Trees – refuse to be complacent in accepting the ills and sorrows of our lives. 

    Rabbi Emma Gottlieb
    Closeup of a dripping home faucet

    We can do better than this. We must do better than this. But it will take all of us to be brave and to speak up.

    Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha
    Panoramic of Utah landscape

    I recently visited Bears Ears National Monument in the company of 20 faith and tribal leaders to raise a moral voice to protect sacred native sites and public lands. 

    Rabbi Nahum Ward-Lev
    Two crossed Bandaids over a patch of brick wall

    Now more than ever, we need spiritual voices of all faiths teaching us messages of justice and compassion. From a Jewish religious perspective, what does "repairing the fallen walls" mean?

    Rabbi Fred Guttman
    View of Earth from space with icicles dripping from the South Pole

    The Un’taneh Tokef scares me. The tragic ends it describes – famine and thirst, flooding and drought – all are imminent possibilities in today’s world.

    Jonah Baskin

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