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Silhouette of a man staring up at the Milky Way night sky

The Jewish mystics also understood that adversity, even tragedy, can hold the key to discovering one’s divine mission or calling.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Woman and dog sitting on dock facing the water at sunset

More than peace, shalom means well-being, health, wholeness, and prosperity. How can we achieve this precious blessing in our lives – for our loved ones and ourselves?

Rabbi Rick Schechter
Dictionary entry for Parkinson's disease

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month, and – in honor of the one million people living with Parkinson’s disease in the United States – I want to share my story.

Barbara Robinson, M.D.
Pocketwatch partially buried in sand

Two years ago, for the first time ever, I didn’t attend a seder. A virulent infection was poisoning my body and I was fighting for my life.

Rabbi Stephen Lewis Fuchs
Spa towel, candles, rocks, and green leaves arrayed against a wood backdrop

to an array of social justice issues can make it difficult to find time to take care of my own well-being. What’s the best way to find the right balance?

Sylvia Levy
Bedside table with an alarm clock flowers and a mug of tea

It is a mitzvah to keep our bodies safe. It is a mitzvah to protect the bodies of others.

Rabbi Ruth Adar
Senator Tammy Duckworth greets smiling advocates in attendance at Jewish Disability Advocacy Day in Washington DC

I am so grateful for the experience I had at JDAD 2018, and I am inspired by the unique approach the Jewish community takes to advocacy on these complex issues.

Sylvia Levy
March participants holding pro choice signs at a rally

Today, Roe v. Wade remains the law of the land. As we celebrate its 45th anniversary, I hope we redouble our commitment to protecting a woman’s right to make her own choices about her body.

Julia Weinstein
Man in business suit with messenger bag and helmet riding a bicycle

Shmirat haguf – literally, guarding the body – is the religious imperative to take care of our body and soul. Learn how you can fulfill this mitzvah in 2018.

Rabbi Rick Schechter
Lit menorah in a window of thick, opaque glass

We always lit two menorahs at Hanukkah: One used candles; the other was electric, with bright orange bulbs. That second one became a precious symbol of life and light.

Sheri Denkensohn-Trott

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