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Barracks at Auschwitz Birkenau in the snow

As the son of Holocaust survivors, I ruled out the possibility of ever visiting a concentration camp. Doing so would be emotionally off the charts.

Marty Yura
People sitting in a synagogue for the congregations Yom HaShoah ceremony

Yom HaShoah is typically a somber time to reflect, and for me personally, to be angry at the world. Last year, however, was different.

Virginia Ring with Dr. Deborah Fripp
President Harry S. Truman and Eddie Jacobson

President Truman’s prompt recognition of the state of Israel in 1948 might not have happened without Eddie Jacobson, a little-known Reform Jew from Kansas City, Missouri.

Rabbi Steven Stark Lowenstein
Statue of Liberty in shadow with sun shining behind her

Learn how the author of this special Passover reading views the many blessings America has offered Jews throughout history.

Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D.
Almond trees in an Israeli orchard

At my seder, as at many, we go around the table, taking turns reading successive pieces of the text.

Jeremy M. Wolfe
Declaration of Independence rolled up between two rolled up American flags

I love sharing how important the greatest Jewish story ever told – the Exodus, the centerpiece of Passover – was to the original, remarkable leaders of America.

Rabbi Rick Schechter
Person at a seder table reading haggadah; glass of wine in foreground

The Feminist Seder was a highlight of my youth. With the explosion of the #MeToo movement, our modern plagues could pack a renewed punch at feminist seders everywhere.

Abigail Pogrebin
Closeup of a map of Europe with a red pushpin on the country of Poland

Silencing speech about inconvenient truths about Polish anti-Semitism smacks of Holocaust denial.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Graphic of an enlarged computer chip

During the 1960s, Israeli scientists laid the groundwork that would enable its institutions and hi-tech companies to flourish, creating a global center for innovation.

Dan Garwood
Lincoln Memorial against black background

Although American Jews widely admired both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, Lincoln was the first president to have extensive social contact with Jews in the U.S.

Rabbi Lance J. Sussman, Ph.D.

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