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Inclusion

Womans hands holding a mug

What’s a “typical” New Yorker? A typical Israeli? A typical Baby Boomer? A typical millennial? A typical Jewish person? A typical immigrant? A typical member of any political party? A typical gender-related characteristic?

Kerry Leaf
Rabbi Rick Jacobs on stage at the URJ Biennial

Did you ever wonder what happened to the 10 Lost Tribes of ancient Israel? In 721 B.C.E., they disappeared. Poof. Gone. Imagine if we could find them today? Our Jewish community could increase to as many as 85 million worldwide. 

Rabbi Rick Jacobs
Sci-Tech campers and staff showing support for the LGBTQIA+ community

At our Reform summer camp, we instill in campers the importance of kavod (respect), helping to create an environment in which everyone can be themselves – without fear.

Rabishaw and Sarah Millstein
Back view of the heads of worshipers facing forward wearing kippot

Those of us who use wheelchairs have accepted the idea that we need to find another way to do this, as we are simply unable to assume a standing position. My question, however, is for everyone else.

Matan A. Koch
Women holding hands in front of a rainbow flag

We read, “Let all who are hungry come and eat.” These words have taken on deep meaning for me as I came out of the closet, got married, and had kids of my own: Our freedom and redemption are founded on being inclusive and welcoming.

Rabbi Dara Lithwick
Jewish star from above made up of people, including some walking to or away from the shape

On the first day of religious school, I introduced myself to my class: “Hi, I’m Sasha Dominguez.” One of the students responded, “Dominguez? That’s not a Jewish last name.”

Sasha Dominguez
Man scribbling the words Americans with Disabilities Act onto glass

I am a lawyer. I graduated Harvard law school and have practiced law for major corporations and large law firms.

Matan Koch
Jeff Erlanger in his electric wheelchair reading Torah from the pulpit

In building the ramp, we felt we had been true to the Talmudic maxim Kol Yisrael Areivim Zeh Bazeh, “All Jews are responsible for one another."

Rabbi Kenneth Roseman
Rubins vase as described in this article

Our realities are, to a degree, relative.

Chris Harrison

Every holiday should be inclusive, but some lend themselves more naturally toward being inclusive than others. Sukkot is one of those.

Lisa Friedman

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