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Interfaith Affairs

About two dozen Jewish and Bahai individuals posing for a photo together

We agreed that we wanted to find ways to continue our relationship and engage in dialogue, so we started brainstorming ideas for future get-togethers.

Lori Levine
Framed artwork that includes Arabic writing on a background of blue, black, and green

This new year, I’m studying Arabic to be able to converse with Palestinians in Israel and the West Bank, augmenting my lifelong caring relationship with Israel.

Rabbi Reuven Greenvald
Three Muslim women with traditional head coverings

A scholar of Judaism and Islam, Professor Reuven Firestone is a Jewish ambassador at conferences throughout the Middle East and beyond. Read about some of his adventures.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Backgammon board, playing discs, and dice

Unforeseen events as a teen found me playing backgammon with two young Arab men in Jerusalem’s Old City. That evening led to my rabbinical studies and so much more.

Rabbi Reuven Firestone
Books on a shelf with different titles on the spines: Judaism, Islam, Catholicism, Hinduism, Buddism, Protestantism

Reform Judaism has been committed to positive engagement across religious lines since its founding in Germany. Today, this work involves members of many faith communities.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Cardinal Keeler receiving honorary degree from HUC-JIR

“Prince of the Church” always seemed an apt title for Cardinal William Keeler of Baltimore, who passed away this morning. 

Mark J. Pelavin
Closeup of a pinecone wreath with berries

My sisters and I grew up in Central Maine, where my family was one of a small handful of Jewish families scattered in this remote, wooded corner of the diaspora.

Courtney Naliboff

In their new book JewAsian: Race, Religion, and Identity for America’s Newest Jews, scholarly husband/wife team Helen Kiyong Kim and Noah Samuel Leavitt examine the intersection of race, religion, and ethnicity in the increasing number of households that are both Jewish American and Asian American (like theirs is).

Aron Hirt-Manheimer

Judaism was so unfamiliar to my son that he was wary of my Hanukkah gift. I felt as though, at such a young age, he was choosing to shun my religion, to identify with Christianity. Of course, if he chooses to identify with either religion later in life, that decision will be his own – but for now, I need to at least give Judaism a fighting chance.

Janine Snyder

There is an enigmatic section in this week’s Torah portion, in Gen. 14:17-20:

Rabbi David Fox Sandmel, Ph.D.

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