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Jewish history

Six postage stamps honoring five U.S. presidents: FDR, Teddy Roosevelt, Washington, JFK, Lincoln, and Washington

American Jewish leaders used to insist that there is no such thing as “Jewish politics,” but their actions tell a quite different story.

Jonathan D. Sarna
A black and white photo of the late Al Vorspan with a pipe in his mouth looking off into the distance

Al Vorspan, a giant for social justice, died on February 17 at the age of 95. Like Amos, Micah, and Isaiah, Al was not afraid to speak truth to power.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Fiddler on the Roof Yiddish

You don’t have to know mamalushen (the mother tongue) to enjoy the hit musical Fidler Afn Dakh, but getting the tam (flavor) of few words will enhance your experience.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
A scene from the jazz opera, Dear Erich

Jazz pianist and composer Ted Rosenthal conceived Dear Erich from 200 letters, written mostly by his grandmother, trapped in Nazi Germany, to his father, safe in America.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Cheese burekas on a white plate with a blue tablecloth underneath

Always on the lookout for new dishes to prepare, I’ve decided to try three (and perhaps more) Jewish recipes in the New Year.

Cantor Deborrah Cannizzaro
Star of David on wrought iron gate leading to old cemetery

The 25th anniversary re-release of Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List has reignited criticism as well as praise for the Oscar-winning film.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Dancing scene from Fiddler on the Roof

The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene’s (People’s Stage) Yiddish version of Fiddler on the Roof is now playing to full houses and standing ovations in New York City.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Shards of broken glass

Today Jews will commemorate the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht (Night of the Broken Glass), the first large-scale attack on German Jews in the Third Reich.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Shadow of sepia-tone WWI soldier against a background of a map of Europe

November 11 marks the centennial of the end of WW I. Leaders on both sides invoked God and religion as they sent more than 5.5 million soldiers to in battle. 

Rabbi A. James Rudin
Group of people gathered at a gravesite in a cemetery

In the wake of the murder of 11 Jews at prayer, congregations and communities have gathered in sanctuaries and in parks and on street corners to mourn the victims.

Rabbi Audrey R. Korotkin, Ph.D.

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