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Dancing scene from Fiddler on the Roof

The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene’s (People’s Stage) Yiddish version of Fiddler on the Roof is now playing to full houses and standing ovations in New York City.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Shards of broken glass

Today Jews will commemorate the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht (Night of the Broken Glass), the first large-scale attack on German Jews in the Third Reich.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Shadow of sepia-tone WWI soldier against a background of a map of Europe

November 11 marks the centennial of the end of WW I. Leaders on both sides invoked God and religion as they sent more than 5.5 million soldiers to in battle. 

Rabbi A. James Rudin
Group of people gathered at a gravesite in a cemetery

In the wake of the murder of 11 Jews at prayer, congregations and communities have gathered in sanctuaries and in parks and on street corners to mourn the victims.

Rabbi Audrey R. Korotkin, Ph.D.
Still from the film featuring Waldheim appearing on Austrian national TV

Ruth Beckermann’s new film is a persuasive accounting of the life and political career of Kurt Josef Waldheim, laying bare the revelations about his World War II military service.

Wes Hopper
Hand holding a test tube containing a DNA sample

There’s nothing like a scheduled, non-funeral visit to old graves to get you thinking about Jewish journeys – where we have come from and, perhaps, where we are going.

Rabbi Michael L. Feshbach
Actors on the set of Arendt-Heidegger: A Love Story

At the core of Douglas Lackey’s new play is the intellectual, emotional, and romantic relationship between Martin Heidegger and Hannah Arendt.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
On one side is Reverend Cornell Williams holding the new book and on the other side is the historic black and white photo of MLK and other black civil rights leaders walking arm in arm with Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath and other Jewish leaders

Together, hundreds of us discovered that when you march carrying the Torah, the Scripture literally crosses and lays upon your heart.

Rev. Cornell William Brooks
Woman playing the cello

For most North American Jews, the haunting melody of Kol Nidrei surely is the piece of liturgy that best represents Yom Kippur, prompting us to delve deep into our souls.

Cantor Deborrah Cannizzaro
Medieval Sephardic synagogue in Castelo de Vide, Portugal

What do dates, pomegranates, apples, spinach, squash, pumpkin, beets, scallions, and maybe even, the cheek meat of a fish have to do with Rosh HaShanah

Rabbi Lisa Sari Bellows

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