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Lifecycle

The author on her wedding day

We knew we wanted our wedding to be a reflection of us and for our families to be woven into the details.

Tani Prell Epstein
Mezuzah hanging on the doorway of a blank wall

“Rabbi, I’m moving tomorrow and just wanted to ask you: Is there a proper way to take down my mezuzah?”

Rabbi Rachel G. Greengrass
Five shiny silver dollars on a blue background

When our son was born, we put a modern spin on the rare tradition of pidyon haben, using the ceremony as one way to welcome him to the Jewish community.

Cantor Lauren Phillips
Closeup of a bride and groom holding hands with a bouquet of wedding flowers on the table next to them

The rabbi gives you a blessing, you exchange rings, you kiss, you party. How hard could it be? Harder than we thought, it turns out.

Moriah Benjoseph
Bride and groom holding hands but faces arent visible

As I plan my wedding, I'm surprised by how often I've been asked whether my fiancé and I will be having a Jewish wedding. Here are some of the Jewish elements we're planning to incorporate into our big day.

Kate Bigam

In the midst of the chaos of planning a bat mitzvah, carving out time to sit together as a family and learn a new ritual together can be a powerful and memorable experience for all involved.

Sarah Resnick

Professionally and personally, I have witnessed the beauty in how the “different” can bring together families, their friends and their Jewish communities. In particular, I was privileged to be part of the process as Aubree Bella became a bat mitzvah

Rabbi Rebecca Dubowe

If you could share one piece of sage advice with a soon-to-be-married couple – your “secret to a long marriage” – what would it be?

Rabbi Paul Kipnes

I wore a button-down, tea-length peach dress with shoulder pads. My mother convinced me that it looked elegant, and that the matching peach tights really completed my look.

Cantor Aviva Marer

Today's North American Reform synagogues have increasingly begun to rethink and attempt to reinvigorate the contemporary practice of bar and bat mitzvah, a practice that may transform Reform Judaism in general. In many ways, these conversations are reminiscent of the emergence of confirmation at the beginning of the 19th century, a significant part of a broad effort to re-envision Judaism's well known adolescent rites-de-passage in communities throughout central Europe. In time, confirmation, largely became associated with Reform Judaism.

Rabbi Lance J. Sussman

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