Search and the other Reform websites:

Women Leaders

Little girl wearing a superhero mask and boxing gloves

With movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp, it is the time for women to mobilize using the fearless power of their voices.

Susannah R. Cohen
Ordination photo of Rabbi Sally Priesand

Read thoughts and reflections of Rabbi Sally J. Priesand, the Reform Jewish Movement's first ordained female rabbi.

Aron Hirt-Manheimer
Dark night full of stars above a campfire near a lake

I’m continually amazed by the way Jewish ritual has a way of lifting up everyday moments and making them holy here at Jewish summer camp.

Lisa David
Brass lock and key on wooden background

The story of Zelophechad’s daughters illustrates not only their triumph in changing the law, but also how Jewish tradition understands the need for Torah to change.

Rabbi Jeff Goldwasser
Five women, seen from behind, arms raised and holding hands

When we learn Zelophechad’s daughters’ names – Mahlah, Noah, Hoglah, Milcah, and Tirzah – we connect to their story, and the injustice they faced as women.

Sarah Greenberg
Smiling women of all ages and ethnicities wearing brightly colored clothing and standing in a line against a white brick wall

In 1987, Congress officially designated March as National Women’s History Month. How do we honor the women who have paved the way for our successes, Jewishly, in our communities?

Maya Weinstein
Black and white image of marchers holding a sign that reads WOMEN OF THE WORLD UNITE

Today is International Women’s Day, a day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women and also to commit to global action to accelerate gender parity.

Kate Bigam
Two girls jumping in the air on the beach

It wasn’t until I fell in love with Judaism that I stopped seeing my successes as being despite my womanhood but rather because of it.

Zoe Terner

Inspired by Kwanzaa, a festival celebrated by many African Americans in which each day of the holiday (from December 26 – January 1) is dedicated to a different core principle, my family and I dedi

Amy Soule

Nearly 40 years ago, I stood on the bimah as a bat mitzvah, the first young woman in my family to celebrate my Jewish coming of age. Its significance was totally lost on me, however. Having been raised to believe that both boys and girls could pretty much do anything they wanted, what was the big deal, I wondered.

Abigail Fisher


Subscribe to RSS - Women Leaders