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women's equality

Woman in bright pink sweater (face obscured) speaking into megaphone

This week’s Torah portion reminds me of the many times I’ve been told to be quiet – especially when it was because our society has left little room for women’s voices.

Sara Barrack
The author with his newborn daughter

As a new father in the era of #metoo, I want to empower my daughter by giving her the necessary tools and confidence to overcome whatever obstacles might land in her path.

Isaac Nuell
Row of people standing against a wall

We must create conversations and ask hard questions, fostering a culture of brave outspokenness. This year, I have been on a journey to tackle issues of gender-based violence in my own Jewish community.

Sylvia Levy
Little girl wearing a superhero mask and boxing gloves

With movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp, it is the time for women to mobilize using the fearless power of their voices.

Susannah R. Cohen
Hand using a wooden spoon to stir a pot of soup

My involvement with Judaism began in college, I engaged in Jewish culture in my kitchen and cooking became an accessible path into a world of Jewish tradition.

Chelsea Feuchs
Brass lock and key on wooden background

The story of Zelophechad’s daughters illustrates not only their triumph in changing the law, but also how Jewish tradition understands the need for Torah to change.

Rabbi Jeff Goldwasser
Five women, seen from behind, arms raised and holding hands

When we learn Zelophechad’s daughters’ names – Mahlah, Noah, Hoglah, Milcah, and Tirzah – we connect to their story, and the injustice they faced as women.

Sarah Greenberg
Young girl with blonde curls dressed in superhero costume with mask and boxing gloves

Equal Pay Day symbolizes the extra time women, on average, need to work each year to earn the same salary as men.

Rabbi Marla J. Feldman
Smiling women of all ages and ethnicities wearing brightly colored clothing and standing in a line against a white brick wall

In 1987, Congress officially designated March as National Women’s History Month. How do we honor the women who have paved the way for our successes, Jewishly, in our communities?

Maya Weinstein
Closeup of a belly dancers stomach adorned with silk and jewels

Reform Jewish poet Stacey Z. Robinson wrote this original poem for Purim: "I remember when he crooned / Come, dance for me! / And I would / just for him." But then...

Stacey Zisook Robinson

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