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Catch Up on Your Reading!

Catch Up on Your Reading!

An intense and record-breaking snow storm descended on D.C. this week, halting most official business throughout the city--including within our courts.  Court dates and trials were postponed and hearings and confirmation votes for judicial nominees were rescheduled. The Blog of the Legal Times featured photographs of snow-covered federal courts in D.C.'s Judiciary Square.

Of course, being stuck inside is a great excuse to catch up on reading!  I want to recommend a few court-related reads to keep you busy, whether you are fighting to stay cozy indoors or just looking for some interesting new material:

  1. In honor of Black History Month, SCOTUSblog is featuring posts about the impact of the federal judiciary on issues related to racial justice and civil rights. They will have posts throughout the month of February from "law professors, litigators, historians, journalists, and other top professionals" on various topics, all of which contribute to SCOTUSblog's effort to further educate the American public about the impact that the courts have had (and continue to have) on American society and our current social and political realities.
     
  2. If you haven't already done so, check out Brent Walker's "The Decade in Religious Liberty." This piece, featured in a previous post on the RACblog, provides a concise and insightful overview of how Establishment and Free Exercise Clause jurisprudence have fared in the first decade of the 21st Century.
     
  3. The Citizens United v. FEC decision may seem like "old news" by now, but it is a decision that will potentially have consequences, both predictable and unforeseen, on electoral politics for years to come. Last week, Stanley Fish wrote an interesting and informative opinion piece for the New York Times, explaining both the majority and minority opinions in this decision. He makes both sides of the argument more accessible and understandable - not an easy feat for such a complex case. (You should also check out Fish's follow-up piece, responding to various comments that he received and clarifying a few more of the issues involved.)
     
  4. Go back a few issues of Newsweek to read a profile of our newest Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. This lengthy exploration of Justice Sotomayor's life offers fun, interesting, and probing tidbits about her journey from the Bronx to the bench. It also illuminates some details about how she has fared during her first term as a justice.

Published: 2/12/2010

Categories: Social Justice
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