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How Much Do You Know about Religion in the U.S.?

How Much Do You Know about Religion in the U.S.?

Jewish Christian and Muslim symbols in black against a light blue background

How much do you know about religion in the U.S.? The Pew Research Center interactive 15-question quiz tests your knowledge on the subject, asking questions about Christianity, Catholicism, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

Though I just took it for the first time, the quiz isn’t particularly new. In fact, it was released in 2010 as part of Pew’s U.S. Religious Knowledge Survey results. The survey (conducted and analyzed separately from quiz scores) found that Jews, atheists, agnostics, and Mormons scored highest in their knowledge of U.S. religions. Those three groups answered, on average, 20 out of 32 questions correctly, with atheists/agnostics having a slight edge at an average of 20.9 correct responses. Pew says the three groups “[outperform] evangelical Protestants, mainline Protestants and Catholics on questions about the core teachings, history and leading figures of major world religions.”

I was pleased to find that answered 14 out of 15 questions correctly, scoring better than 97% of the general public – but considering that I work for a religious organization, that’s probably not a fair comparison. Your personal quiz results will also allow you to compare your religious knowledge with the overall population, with people of individual religious traditions, with people who attend worship services frequently or less often, and more.

After you’ve taken the quiz, comment here to let us know: How’d you do? Did you learn anything new?

Kate Bigam Kaput is the digital communications manager for the Union for Reform Judaism and, in this role, serves as a content manager and editor for ReformJudaism.org. A prolific essayist and lifestyle blogger, Kate's writing has been featured in The Washington PostEsquire, Woman's Day, Cleveland Magazine, HeyAlma.com, Jewish Women Archive, and more. Kate grew up at Temple Beth Shalom in Hudson, OH, holds a degree in magazine journalism from Kent State University, and currently lives in Cleveland with her husband, Mike.

Kate Bigam Kaput

Published: 6/12/2017

Categories: Jewish Life, Interfaith/Interreligious
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