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Torah Portion

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March 30 - April 6, 2018

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On the Other Hand: Ten Minutes of Torah


Tune in to hear Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the Union For Reform Judaism, offer divrei Torahd'var Torahדְּבַר תּוֹרָה“Word(s) of Torah.” (pl. divrei Torah). A brief oral teaching to the congregation which explores themes of the Torah portion or other Jewish content. In many communities, a child celebrating b'nai mitzvah (bar/bat mitzvah) will prepare and deliver an original d’var Torah during the worship service. (insights into the weekly Torah portion) to help open up Jewish thought and its contemporary influence on your life. Subscribe now and find transcripts in the episode pages below.

Blog posts on any holiday

Tu BiShvat - Nature’s Invitation to Grow

January 25, 2023
Tu BiShvat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees, is upon us. While it may not be the most celebrated new year in the Jewish tradition, there is a simple power to the holiday - the call for us to become attuned to nature and learn what it can teach us about personal growth.

New Year, Same Me: Finding the Diamond Within

December 15, 2022
As Jews, we have the opportunity to celebrate the New Year not once, but several times. The Jewish year has four different New Year celebrations: Rosh HaShanah, Passover, Tu BiShvat, and Elul. Many Jews also celebrate the Gregorian New Year in January. That means we get five opportunities every year to do an accounting of our soul (cheshbon hanefesh) and make resolutions for growth and betterment.

Sharing the Miracle of Jewish Joy

December 14, 2022
Conversations about Hanukkah are few and far between in our ancient texts; most of what the Talmud records about Hanukkah is within a few pages in the tractate called Shabbat. But, as is so often the case, those millennia-old words have grown in significance as we prepare for Hanukkah 5783.

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Answers to Jewish Questions

What is the Reform Jewish perspective on abortion?

This Week's Torah Portion

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This Week's Torah Portion

Yitro
יִתְרוֹ
Jethro

Jethro, priest of Midian, Moses' father-in-law, heard all that God had done for Moses and for Israel, God's people, how the Eternal had brought Israel out from Egypt. - Exodus 18:1

Torah

Exodus 18:1–20:23

Haftarah

Isaiah 6:1-7:6; 9:5-6

When

/ 20 Shevat 5783

This Week's Torah Portion

Image
This Week's Torah Portion

Yitro
יִתְרוֹ
Jethro

Jethro, priest of Midian, Moses' father-in-law, heard all that God had done for Moses and for Israel, God's people, how the Eternal had brought Israel out from Egypt. - Exodus 18:1

Torah

Exodus 18:1–20:23

Haftarah

Isaiah 6:1-7:6; 9:5-6

When

/ 20 Shevat 5783

On the Other Hand: Ten Minutes of Torah


Tune in to hear Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the Union For Reform Judaism, offer divrei Torahd'var Torahדְּבַר תּוֹרָה“Word(s) of Torah.” (pl. divrei Torah). A brief oral teaching to the congregation which explores themes of the Torah portion or other Jewish content. In many communities, a child celebrating b'nai mitzvah (bar/bat mitzvah) will prepare and deliver an original d’var Torah during the worship service. (insights into the weekly Torah portion) to help open up Jewish thought and its contemporary influence on your life. Subscribe now and find transcripts in the episode pages below.

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What is Torah?

Torah usually refers to the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible – Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. These books make up the story of the Jewish people. These ancient stories touch upon science, history, philosophy, ritual and ethics. Included are stories of individuals, families, wars, slavery and more. Virtually no subject was taboo for Torah. Running through these stories is the unique lens through which the Jewish people would come to view their world and their God.