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Rosh HaShanah

Rosh HaShanah

Rosh HaShanah

Rosh HaShanah recipes blessing and family activities

Rosh HaShanah

Recent Content

Articles

  • Whether you listen to these songs along or with others, may they lead you to thoughts of turning our hearts toward the rich opportunities the New Year brings, or perhaps a moment to reflect on the times we’ve “missed the mark” and not been our best selves.

  • Our fondest memories often center on family gatherings and delicious meals that include foods related to specific Jewish holidays – matzah brei on Passover, latkes during Hanukkah, or cheesecake on Shavuot

  • Here you will find blessings for home rituals during the Rosh HaShanah holiday. Lighting candles, offering thanks for sweetness and sustenance, and celebrating the cycle of life we travel each year while around a table with family and friends can add richness to your Holy Day observance.

Blogs

Video

Recipes

  • Honey cake is traditionally eaten for Rosh HaShanah, the Jewish New Year—the honey’s sweetness symbolizes our wishes for a sweet year. This is my mother's recipe, which she makes in Israel, freezes, and sends to me in the mail.

  • Sally's daughter Rita writes, "My late mother, Sally Rosenkranz, who was from Radom, Poland, lost her mother in the Holocaust."

  • Entertain your Rosh HaShanah guests while enjoying the traditional holiday nosh of apples, honey, and pomegranate seeds in a new way.

Torah Commentary

  • Leviticus, a priestly book, has as its primary focus an emphasis on the cleanliness of the community and its adherence to ritual matters for the sake of God’s blessings. … In the portion called, Emor, a significant redundancy occurs in the Hebrew text. We read that God said to Moses: Emor el hakohanim b’nei Aharon, ve-amarta aleihem… “Speak to the priests, the sons of Aaron, and you shall say to them…” (Leviticus 21:1).

  • In Parashat Emor, the Torah reports that a man born of mixed Israelite-Egyptian descent “blasphemed the Name [of God],” was placed on trial, and was stoned to death. A law was then enacted that anyone, Jewish or gentile, who blasphemes the name of God shall be put to death. Over time, in communities throughout the world, laws against blasphemy were put in place to address curses leveled at God as well as perceived slights against some religions. 

  • In Parashat Emor, the verses in Leviticus 23:1-44 name and describe the sacred times of the Jewish calendar: Shabbat, Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur, and the Pilgrimage Festivals of Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot. Time becomes a holy thing, and the "normalcy" of time — of one day being no different than any other — is forever differentiated by the weekly Sabbath and by these special festive days.

Blessings

Answers to Jewish Questions