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Children's Literature

Even though Hershel can no longer see, he remembers what things looked like before he lost his sight. After a vivid dream in which an angel reminds him to use that special ability, Hershel creates beautiful shapes from his mother’s hamentashen dough. His cookies earn him a compliment and a possible future job from the town baker.

When her early childhood class plans a Shavuot hike, Sadie is afraid she won’t be able to make it to the top of the “mountain” and tries to think of ways to avoid the walk. When the day arrives, it’s much different (and better!) than Sadie expected.  

Sophie enjoys special time spent with each of her grandmothers, and eating their delicious chicken soup. Both her Jewish Bubbe and her Chinese Nai Nai have a special family recipe, and both compete for a special place in Sophie’s heart.

Yom Kippur and toddlers don’t seem to go together very well. On the most solemn day of the calendar, it can be difficult to figure out what to do with a young child who isn’t ready to sit in services all day.

Noah loves everything about summer camp  except swimming. Yet, when he finds out about a camp swim-a-thon that will give other children a chance to attend the camp he loves, Noah leaps at the chance to jump in the water and do his part to help. By participating in his camp's tzedakah project, Noah overcomes his anxiety about the pool and instead focuses on the positive feelings that come with fulfilling a mitzvah! 

When Abby moves with her family to Israel, she misses her grandmother and remembers the fun they had with each other. Writing to each other helps, but it isn’t the same as spending time together. Abby grows more and more acclimated to Israel, but never stops thinking of her grandmother, especially while she waits for the first rain.

As Shavuot approaches, Sarah, Max and their five children begin to save money to purchase the ingredients for Sarah’s fabulous blintzes, so they can make a mountain of blintzes as big as Mount Sinai! Mother, father and the children each try to bring something to the table to make the blintzes.

Make story and snuggle time Jewish time: read a Jewish book with your child! Read this review of The Passover Lamb for great ideas on how to engage your child.

Nate and his classmates are working on their Purim costumes. All the boys in his class are planning to wear superhero costumes, but Nate loves aliens and would like to dress as an alien. Reluctantly, Nate decides to dress like the other boys as a superhero -- until one of his dads reminds Nate of the Purim story.

A litle apple tree is jealous of the big tall oak, until one day it discovers something surprising.  This Tu BiShvat story teaches that everyone has qualities that make them special in a unique way, and is a lesson about patience and the passing of time.

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