Search URJ.org and the other Reform websites:

grandparenting

In this sneeze-filled episode, we find the magical Sparks Gabi and Rafi fighting off their own colds while they help the Plony family realize that Grandpa needs cheering up in the hospital. Gabi’s sniffles manage to misdirect her magic to hilarious effect. A rainstorm of chicken soup and a flock of quacking ducks eventually persuade the family to visit Grandpa.

Passover is one of the most popular Jewish holidays. One way we celebrate is by going to a very special dinner party called a Seder. We read a script from a book called a Haggadah which urges us to try foods we don’t usually eat, encourages us to ask questions, play with our food and even slouch in our chairs! Why? Why indeed!

The Passover Seder is the ultimate educational experience. It is an interactive method of story-telling, a learning (and re-learning) of our people's ancient memory, and navigating through text and time and tradition to make that story our own. Use this resource to engage in a dialogue with your teen, or as a starting point for them to lead a seder table discussion.

Join the magical “Sparks” Gabi and Rafael as they teach a lesson in hospitality to the Plony family members, who are too distracted to hear the doorbell ringing when their cousin arrives from Israel. Watch the video and engage in discussions and activities to extend the lessons.

After your child returns from camp and catches up on sleep, what do you ask to avoid the dreaded "We did fun stuff" response?

As Shavuot approaches, Sarah, Max and their five children begin to save money to purchase the ingredients for Sarah’s fabulous blintzes, so they can make a mountain of blintzes as big as Mount Sinai! Mother, father and the children each try to bring something to the table to make the blintzes.

For some children, the seder means delicious jellied candies and afikoman hunts. For others it can mean terrifying public reading and unbearable amounts of sitting still at the table. And for those disabilities – whether psychological, developmental or language-based – it’s clear this night is different from all other nights. But can somebody slow down and please explain why?

They're everywhere these days: ads for toys show up on TV, in shop windows, and throughout your Facebook newsfeed. When you're a parent to kids who have been mentally compiling their Hanukkah wish lists since autumn began, it can be difficult not to get swept up in the consumerism that often accompanies the holiday season.

Poor Bear! It is a beautiful day outside but he is too sick to enjoy it. He is too uncomfortable even to sleep. Bear’s friends come to visit him and each one does something to try and make him feel better. The very best thing these friends do for each other is make sure no one suffers alone. Learn more about this excellent children's book and how it teaches Jewish values.

We are challenged to reconcile many conflicting thoughts and emotions as we hear daily of the ongoing conflict in Israel. Strong and heartfelt as our commitment is to the security of Israel, we experience a sense of grief at the ongoing violence and over the loss of life in Israel, as well as among Palestinians.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - grandparenting