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Passover Recipe

Vegan Coconut Rum Raisin Tapioca Pudding

By: 
Kenden Alfond

Eating animal-based dairy on Shavuot is a tradition that I am updating to meet my health goals and dietary preferences. I find ways to enjoy healthier “creamy” foods for the holiday by creating non-dairy “creamy” dessert options like this delicious one. 

Tapioca, made from cassava (yuca) root vegetable, is a comeback food. I asked my parents and aunts and uncle and they all agree that they enjoyed tapioca pudding in their youth. 

Tapioca is a lifelong food that can be enjoyed by everyone – from babyhood to old age.  It is a gooey, creamy mouth food that is eaten by the spoonful. The added rum-soaked raisins makes the dessert fancy and may remind you of the ice cream flavor rum raisin.

Ingredients: 
1/2 cup small tapioca pearls
3 1/2 cups good quality mineral water
1/2 cup coconut milk cream
1/4 cup natural cane sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup raisins
2 tablespoons dark rum, or brandy
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
Directions: 

Equipment: medium strainer, medium saucpan, individual bowls for serving

  1. In a small bowl, combine the raisins and rum, and set aside.
  2. Rinse the tapioca pearls in strainer.
  3. Place tapioca in medium saucepan and add 3 cups of water. Soak the tapioca for 30 minutes. Do not drain after soaking.
  4. Add the coconut cream, sugar, rum-soaked raisins and rum (it may be all soaked into the raisins) and kosher salt.
  5. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mixture comes to a gentle boil. Simmer uncovered over very low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until mixture is thick (it if becomes too thick add a bit more water).
  6. Stir well.
  7. Pour into bowls. Serve warm or chilled. Place plastic wrap on top of bowls so that the pudding does not develop a skin. 

Reprinted with permission from © JewishFoodHero - All Rights Reserved.

Kenden Alfond is the founder of Jewish Food Hero, the website that nourishes your mind, body, and spirit. Her mission is to help a global community of women come home to themselves. Visit the site to download a free cookbook: 7 Healthy Plant-Based Jewish Recipes.

Mock Mac and Cheese for Passover

By: 
The Garden City Jewish Center Sisterhood

Kids especially love this recipe during Passover week, which can feel like a long time without bread, pizza, and pasta!

Ingredients: 
3 large eggs
3 1/2 cups matzah farfel (6 matzah broken up).
1/2 pound cheddar cheese (8 ounces shredded)
6 tablespoons melted butter or margarine
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon white or black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 pint sour cream
Directions: 
  • Mix all ingredients and place in a 2-quart casserole.

  • Cover and bake at 350°F for 30 minutes.

  • Uncover, and bake 15 minutes longer until golden brown.

​Note: For a large crowd, quadruple the recipe to yield two large trays.

Key Lime Pie for Passover

By: 
Joan Hocky

Want a break from all the chocolate and fruit slices at the end of your Seder, or a special dessert during Passover that’s a bit more Spring-like in taste and appearance? Here’s an easy, fool-proof key lime pie with a matzah meal crust that is delicious!

This pie has been my required contribution at family events for years. I resisted sharing the recipe for a long time, mostly because I didn’t want to admit how easy it was to make. In fact, the original recipe from which this was adapted was a Blue Ribbon first-place winner in the “Quick and Easy” category at the National Pie Championship of the American Pie Council (bet you didn’t know that was a thing : ).

I discovered this crust a few years ago, which is almost as good as the original graham cracker one. If you have nut allergies, you can leave out the almonds. And if you can’t do milchig (dairy) at your Seder, this is a lovely finish to a Passover dairy brunch or dinner.

Ingredients: 
FILLING
4 egg yolks, beaten
Two 14-ounce cans sweetened condensed milk (see below for kosher for Passover directions)
1 cup key lime juice (regular limes are fine, just make sure it’s fresh-squeezed.)
..................................................................................
CRUST
3/4 cup sliced almonds, walnuts or hazelnuts, toasted [place nuts on cookie sheet in 350ºF oven for 10-15 minutes until lightly colored, then cool completely.]
2/3 cup sugar
2/3 cup matzah cake meal (I use gluten-free)
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, melted and cooled slightly.
Directions: 

For the Crust

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF with rack in middle.
  2. Pulse almonds, sugar, matzah cake meal, and salt in a food processor until finely ground. (If you don’t have a food processor, you can mix all ingredients thoroughly by hand.)
  3. Transfer to a bowl and stir in butter until combined well.
  4. Press lightly onto bottom and up side of pie pan, preferably deep dish.
  5. Bake until crust is firm and a shade darker, 12 to 15 minutes.
  6. Cool crust completely in pan on a rack.

For the Filling

  1. Preheat oven to 375º F.
  2. Combine the egg yolks, sweetened condensed milk and lime juice. Mix well. Pour into cooled pie shell.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes or until bubbles just start to form. Remove from oven, garnish with lime zest and allow to cool.

To make kosher for Passover sweetened condensed milk, combine 1 cup instant nonfat dry milk, 2/3 cup sugar, 1/3 cup boiling water and 3 tablespoons margarine.


Joan Hocky is a writer with a background in community development, the arts, and education, with a focus on increasing opportunities and resources for underserved and marginalized communities and an expertise in relationship-building and problem solving with diverse stakeholders. She raises children, vegetables, provocative ideas, and dreams about having more time to write, including on her blog, Grace and Dirt.

Seder Plate Salad

By: 
Paula Shoyer

This is my version of a French Niçoise salad. I make it with lamb instead of tuna, and it contains the ritual components of the seder plate and table. The dressing is made from kosher sweet wine and maror (the bitter herb, in this case, white horseradish), creating a creamy pink dressing. This salad also makes a nice lunch or light dinner during Chol HaMo-eid, the nonholiday days of Passover.

Ingredients: 
SALAD
2 pieces of lamb shoulder (about 20 ounces/ 600g total)
2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and black pepper
1 large head romaine lettuce, cut into 2-inch (5-cm) pieces
2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
1 cup (40g) loosely packed fresh parsley leaves, roughly chopped
1/3 cup (40g) walnut halves, roughly chopped into 1/2-inch (12-mm) pieces
2 apples (Red Delicious, Fuji, or Gala), cored and cut into 3/4-inch (2-cm) cubes
3 large eggs, hard-boiled and quartered
.....................................................................................
DRESSING
1/2 cup (120ml) mayonnaise
4 teaspoons jarred white horseradish
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons sweet kosher wine
Salt and black pepper
.....................................................................................
EQUIPMENT
Cutting board, knives, measuring cups and spoons, small saucepan, tongs, small bowl, whisk, large serving bowl
.....................................................................................
Directions: 

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook TIme: 10 minutes
Advance Prep: Dressing and lamb may be made 2 days in advance

Preheat oven to broil or an outdoor grill to medium-high heat.

To make the lamb

Rub the lamb shoulder pieces with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Broil or grill for 4 to 5 minutes per side for medium rare, or until desired doneness. Let cool for 5 minutes and, if serving immediately, slice into thin, 2-inch-long (5-cm) pieces. If making in advance, wait to slice the lamb until after reheating. The lamb may be roasted 2 days in advance; cover and store in the fridge.

To make the salad dressing

In a small bowl, whisk the mayonnaise, white horseradish, sugar, and wine until well combined. Add salt and pepper to taste. The dressing may be made 2 days in advance; cover and store in the fridge.

To assemble the salad

Place the romaine pieces in a large bowl. Add the celery and parsley and toss to combine. Sprinkle the walnuts and apples on top and arrange the egg quarters around the perimeter of the bowl. Scatter the lamb pieces on top. To serve, scoop some of everything onto each plate and drizzle with the dressing.


Reprinted with permission from New Passover Menu © 2015 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Michael Bennett Kress

Paula Shoyer, “the kosher baker,” is the author of The Holiday Kosher BakerThe Kosher BakerThe New Passover Menu and The Healthy Jewish Kitchen (November 2017). Paula graduated with a pastry degree from the Ritz Escoffier in Paris, and does cooking and baking demos across the United States and around the world for Jewish organizations, synagogues, Jewish book festivals and more. She is a freelance writer for the Washington PostHadassahJoy of Kosher, and Jewish Food Experience, among other publicationsPaula competed on Food Network's Sweet Genius and appears on TV before every major Jewish holiday – over 26 times. In 2015, Paula was honored by Jewish Women International as a “Woman to Watch” and in 2016 as a “kosher food pioneer” by the kosher food bloggers community. Paula lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland with her husband and four children.

Carrot Tzimmes with Dumplings

By: 
Tina Wasserman

This recipe is featured in Tina Wasserman's cookbook, Entree to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora. "In Tina's recipes each ingredient tells a story. Each recipe expresses an ethical value, explores an historical event, evokes a memory." - Rabbi Debra Robbins, Temple Emanu-El, Dallas, TX  

When I was young, I loved Mrs. Adler’s jarred carrot tzimmes. I created this recipe in Texas when it was no longer available. It’s great for Passover too!

This is also a favorite Ashkenazic dish for Rosh HaShanah. The Yiddish word for carrot is mehren, which also means "increase," and according to The Rosh Hashanah Anthology the eating of carrot tzimmes is accompanied by the expression: "May it be Thy will that our merits will be increased." Carrots were also cooked whole and then sliced into circles, resembling coins in color and shape. This patently added to a yearning for a prosperous new year. 

Ingredients: 
1 pound carrots, steamed and sliced, or 1 pound cooked frozen carrots
1/3 cup chicken stock (or pareve bouillon)
1/3 cup orange juice
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/3 cup honey
1 tablespoon pareve margarine
1 1/2 teaspoons potato starch dissolved in 3 tablespoons water
Leftover matzah balls, quartered, or 12 miniature matzah balls prepared according to instructions in step 1
Directions: 
  1. Make matzah ball mixture according to your favorite recipe. Use part of the mixture to make miniature balls by shaping 1/2 teaspoon of dough into a ball in your oiled hands and adding it to the boiling water. Cook and reserve matzah balls for later.
  2. Place sliced cooked carrots, stock, orange juice, ginger, and honey in a saucepan and heat to boiling.
  3. Reduce heat and add margarine.
  4. Give potato starch mixture a stir to recombine and add to the carrots. Stir constantly until mixture thickens.5. When mixture has thickened, add the reserved matzah balls and gently combine until the dumplings are coated and heated through.
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • If you want to make a portion of carrots look larger, slice them on the diagonal.
  • Always stir a hot mixture as you add a potato starch–water mixture to it. Potato starch will congeal instantly if not stirred rapidly.
  • An easy way to make little matzah balls is to put the mixture in a pastry bag fitted with a number 6 tip. Squeeze out 1/2 inch of dough and cut it off with a knife over the pot of boiling water.

What can you serve for dessert when cake and cookies are off the (Passover) table? Lots!

Here are some of our favorite dessert recipes that happen to be kosher for Passover. Best yet, all of them can be made dairy-free!

Matzah ball soup is one of the most recognizeable Passover dishes, indeed, Jewish dishes, ever.

As with any classic dish, there are many ways to make it, all of them delicious in different ways. We have collected some of our favorite recipes here for you.

Chocolate Quinoa Cake

By: 
Paula Shoyer

I had heard the myth of chocolate cakes made with cooked quinoa and didn’t quite believe they’d actually be tasty. This cake is surprisingly moist and delicious—great for Passover and all year round.

This recipe may be made 3 days in advance or frozen. 

Ingredients: 
CAKE
3/4 cup (130g) quinoa
1 1/2 cups (360ml) water
Cooking spray
2 tablespoons potato starch
1/3 cup (80ml) orange juice (from 1 orange)
4 large eggs
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract (or other vanilla if for Passover)
3/4 cup (180ml) coconut oil
1 1/2 cups (300g) sugar
1 cup (80g) dark unsweetened cocoa
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 ounces (55g) bittersweet chocolate
Fresh raspberries, for garnish (optional)
.....................................................................
GLAZE (OPTIONAL)
5 ounces (140g) bittersweet chocolate
1 tablespoon sunflower or safflower oil
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (or other vanilla if for Passover)
Directions: 

Prep time: 20 minutes • Bake time: 15 minutes to cook quinoa, 50 minutes to bake cake • Advance prep: May be made 3 days in advance or frozen • Equipment: Measuring cups and spoons, small saucepan with lid, 12-cup (2.8L) Bundt pan, food processor, medium microwave-safe bowl or double boiler, silicone spatula, wooden kebab skewer, wire cooling rack, large microwave-safe bowl, whisk
..............................................................................

• Place the quinoa and water into a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover the saucepan, and cook the quinoa for 15 minutes, or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Set the pan aside. The quinoa may be made 1 day in advance.

• Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Use cooking spray to grease a 12-cup (2.8L) Bundt pan. Sprinkle the potato starch over the greased pan and then shake the pan to remove any excess starch.

• Place the quinoa in the bowl of a food processor. Add the orange juice, eggs, vanilla, oil, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, and salt and process until the mixture is very smooth.

• Melt the chocolate over a double boiler, or place in a medium microwave-safe bowl, and put in a microwave for 45 seconds, stirring and then heating the chocolate for another 30 seconds, until it is melted. Add the chocolate to the quinoa batter and process until well mixed. Pour the batter into the prepared Bundt pan and bake it for 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean.

• Let the cake cool for 10 minutes and then remove it gently from the pan. Let it cool on a wire cooling rack.

• To make the glaze, melt the chocolate in a large microwave-safe bowl in the microwave (see above) or over a double boiler. Add the oil and vanilla and whisk well. Let the glaze sit for 5 minutes and then whisk it again. Use a silicone spatula to spread the glaze all over the cake.


Reprinted with permission from The Healthy Jewish Kitchen © 2017 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Epicure. Photography by Bill Milne.

Paula Shoyer, “the kosher baker,” is the author of The Holiday Kosher BakerThe Kosher BakerThe New Passover Menu and The Healthy Jewish Kitchen (November 2017). Paula graduated with a pastry degree from the Ritz Escoffier in Paris, and does cooking and baking demos across the United States and around the world for Jewish organizations, synagogues, Jewish book festivals and more. She is a freelance writer for the Washington PostHadassahJoy of Kosher, and Jewish Food Experience, among other publicationsPaula competed on Food Network's Sweet Genius and appears on TV before every major Jewish holiday – over 26 times. In 2015, Paula was honored by Jewish Women International as a “Woman to Watch” and in 2016 as a “kosher food pioneer” by the kosher food bloggers community. Paula lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland with her husband and four children.

Chicken Soup with Chicken Meatballs and Zucchini Spaghetti

By: 
Paula Shoyer

Like most people, I love matzah balls. Although everyone knows me as a from-scratch baker, I am admitting here that I always make matzah balls from the mix. After eating my mother’s matzah balls for years, which alternated from year to year between light and fluffy and something else (I think because of variations in egg sizes), once I tried the balls from the mix, I never went back. Constant dieting has forced me to avoid them, so I developed chicken meatballs as an alternative. They even look like matzah balls. But the traditionalists out there need not worry, as I have also provided ideas below for updating traditional matzah balls.

This soup may be made 3 days in advance or frozen; meatballs may be made 1 day in advance.

Ingredients: 
SOUP:
2 whole medium chickens, cut into pieces
2 large onions, quartered
6 carrots, peeled and cut in half
1 leek, white and light green parts only, cut lengthwise in half
6 stalks celery with leaves, cut crosswise in half
4 cloves garlic, peeled
2 parsnips, peeled and cut in thirds
1 fennel bulb, quartered
1 turnip, peeled and quartered
2 bay leaves
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 gallon (3.8L) water
1/2 bunch parsley
1/2 bunch dill
Salt and black pepper
....................................................................
CHICKEN MEATBALLS:
2 boneless chicken breasts (about 5–6 ounces each)
1/4 cup (60ml) chicken stock
2 tablespoons ground almonds or matzah meal
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 large egg
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
....................................................................
GARNISH:
2 medium zucchini, not peeled
....................................................................
Directions: 

To make the soup

Place the chicken pieces in a large pot. Add the onions, carrots, leek, celery, garlic, parsnips, fennel, turnip, bay leaves, and salt. Add the water and bring to a boil. Use a large spoon to skim the scum off the top of the soup. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to low, and let the soup simmer, checking after 5 minutes and skimming off any additional scum. Add the parsley and dill, cover, and simmer for 2 hours. Let cool. Strain through a large sieve, reserving the carrots to return to the soup when serving. Taste the soup and add more salt or pepper if necessary.

To make the meatballs

While the soup is cooking, prepare the meatball mixture. In the bowl of a food processor with the metal blade attachment, mix together the chicken, stock, ground almonds, garlic, and egg until a paste forms. Add the scallions, salt, and pepper and pulse a few times to mix. Transfer the meatball mixture to a medium bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and chill for up to 1 day, until ready to shape and cook the meatballs.

Use a spoon to scoop up the meatball batter and wet hands to shape it into 1 1/2-inch (4-cm) balls. Bring the strained soup to a simmer, add the meatballs, cover, and cook for 8 minutes.

To make the garnish

Meanwhile, prepare the zucchini “spaghetti” for the garnish. Slice the zucchini lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick (6-mm) slices. Keeping the stack together, use a vegetable peeler to shave the zucchini into long strips. Slice the reserved cooked carrots into rounds and return them to the soup. Top each serving of soup and meatballs with some of the zucchini spaghetti.

Matzah Ball Variations

Combine your choice of any one of the following with one packet from a 5-ounce (142g) package of matzah ball mix to make 13 matzah balls. Plan on 2 matzah balls per person:

• 1 teaspoon fresh finely chopped ginger plus 2 teaspoons finely chopped cilantro

• 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

• 1 carrot peeled and chopped into 1/4 inch (6 mm) pieces

• 1½ teaspoons mixed finely chopped fresh herbs, such as rosemary, thyme, and basil 


Reprinted with permission from New Passover Menu © 2015 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Michael Bennett Kress

Paula Shoyer, “the kosher baker,” is the author of The Holiday Kosher Baker, The Kosher Baker, The New Passover Menu and The Healthy Jewish Kitchen (November 2017). Paula graduated with a pastry degree from the Ritz Escoffier in Paris, and does cooking and baking demos across the United States and around the world for Jewish organizations, synagogues, Jewish book festivals and more. She is a freelance writer for the Washington Post, Hadassah, Joy of Kosher, and Jewish Food Experience, among other publications. Paula competed on Food Network's Sweet Genius and appears on TV before every major Jewish holiday – over 26 times. In 2015, Paula was honored by Jewish Women International as a “Woman to Watch” and in 2016 as a “kosher food pioneer” by the kosher food bloggers community. Paula lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland with her husband and four children.

Video: Four Cocktails to Enjoy for Passover

At the Passover seder we drink four glasses of wine, but what about the rest of the holiday? Our friends from OneTable.org and the Gefilteria show us how to make four delicious cocktails for Passover (and with the exception of the martini, any of these are delicious with or without the alcohol). 

 

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