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Sephardic Jews

Slow-Cooked Lamb with Potatoes

By: 
Stella Cohen

An easy one-pan lamb and potato dish, which is perfect as a family meal on a chilly night. The lamb is gently simmered on the stovetop then briefly browned in the oven. Traditionally, this flavoursome dish is served for the Passover dinner, paired with a green salad or stewed green beans.

Ingredients: 
3¼ pounds (1.5kg ) shoulder of lamb, cut through the bone into even chunks
5 tablespoons olive oil
2 onions, roughly chopped
2 fresh bay leaves
2 small sprigs fresh rosemary
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
3-4 cups hot chicken stock
2¼ pounds (1kg) waxy potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways
3 tablespoons roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley, use leaves and tender stems
Directions: 

Equipment: An enamelled cast-iron, shallow oven-to-table casserole

  • Trim excess fat from the lamb.
  • Heat 4 tablespoons olive oil in the casserole over a medium-high heat. Add the lamb and cook in batches on all sides until lightly browned. Remove the lamb with tongs and keep in a heatproof dish.
  • Add the onions to the casserole and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened.  Return the browned meat to the pan. Add the bay leaves, rosemary sprigs and season with salt and pepper. Pour enough hot stock to just cover the lamb. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-4 hours or until the meat is tender, adding more stock as necessary. Skim the fat off the cooking juices in the pan.
  • Meanwhile boil the potatoes until just tender and drain.
  • Scatter the potatoes over the lamb and sprinkle with half the parsley. Drizzle remaining olive oil over the potatoes and season with salt and pepper.
  • Preheat the oven to grill/broil 15 minutes before serving. Place under the grill for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are golden brown. Serve at once with the remaining parsley sprinkled on top.

Stella's Hints

  • Ask your butcher to cut the shoulder into roughly 2 - 2 ½-inch chunks.
  • Lamb chops can be used instead of shoulder, which will save cooking time.

Reprinted with permission from Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the Mediterranean island of Rhodes © 2012 by Stella Cohen, The Gerald & Marc Hoberman Collection. Photography by Marc Hoberman.

Sephardic cuisine expert, artist, textile designer, and cookery writer, Stella Cohen is a passionate ambassador for the Jewish community, dedicating her life to the celebration, preservation, and education of Sephardic values and traditions. Stella’s heart lies in Southern Africa as well as in the Mediterranean, as she was born and raised in Zimbabwe and has a family tree entrenched in Sephardic history. Her parents originate from Rhodes, Greece, and Marmaris, Turkey and she is the great-granddaughter of Yaacov Capouya, the Rabbi of Rhodes.

Macaron Reynado de Karne (Macaroni and Meat Bake)

By: 
Stella Cohen

This appetizing Sephardic version of the Greek meat bake pastitsio, is baked in an earthenware ovenproof dish and brought straight to the table. This dish, known as macaron reynado de karne, makes an excellent meal eaten hot or at room temperature for brunches, mezes, picnics and children’s packed lunches. This bake is delicious with a tasty homemade tomato sauce and a green salad. 

Ingredients: 
3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for brushing
6 spring onions (scallions), finely sliced
500g (1 pound) minced (ground) beef or veal
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon finely ground white pepper
1½ cups hot chicken stock
½ cup chopped canned tomatoes
2 tablespoons roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley (use leaves and tender stems)
1 tablespoon roughly chopped fresh dill
500g (1lb 2oz) macaroni, tubular pasta or pasta shells
9 eggs, well beaten
Directions: 
  • Brush a 35x25cm (14x10in) and 6.25cm (2½in) deep earthenware ovenproof dish lightly with olive oil.
  • Heat the oil in a large, heavy-based pan over a medium-high heat. Add the spring onions and cook for 2 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened. Add the meat and salt and pepper and stir for 5 minutes. Crushing the meat with a fork, stir until it changes to a light brown colour.
  • Add 1 cup hot chicken stock and the tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, until the sauce has reduced but is still moist. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Toss in the parsley and dill and transfer to a large bowl.
  • Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and stir frequently as the water returns to a boil. Cook the pasta according to packet instruction until just tender but retaining some bite. Drain well.
  • Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) and heat the oiled dish in the oven for 5 minutes.
  • Add the pasta to the meat mixture and pour in the beaten eggs. Mix well.
  • Remove the heated dish from the oven and immediately pour the mixture into it, evenly distributing the meat and pasta. Smooth the surface with the back of a spoon. Bake in the centre of the oven for 30 minutes or until the top is crusty and golden. Switch off the oven. Pour the remaining ½ cup of hot chicken stock over the baked pasta and return to the still warm oven until the stock has been absorbed.
  • Cut into squares and serve hot or at room temperature.

Reprinted with permission from Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the Mediterranean island of Rhodes © 2012 by Stella Cohen, The Gerald & Marc Hoberman Collection. Photography by Marc Hoberman.

Sephardic cuisine expert, artist, textile designer, and cookery writer, Stella Cohen is a passionate ambassador for the Jewish community, dedicating her life to the celebration, preservation, and education of Sephardic values and traditions. Stella’s heart lies in Southern Africa as well as in the Mediterranean, as she was born and raised in Zimbabwe and has a family tree entrenched in Sephardic history. Her parents originate from Rhodes, Greece, and Marmaris, Turkey and she is the great-granddaughter of Yaacov Capouya, the Rabbi of Rhodes.

Cheese Scones

By: 
Stella Cohen

These Greek inspired cheese scones are so quick and easy to make that even my young grandchildren often bake them for a scrumptious savoury snack. In Rhodes Island, the Sephardim who called these cheese scones boyikos de kezo also referred to them as boyikos de rayo – derived from rayo in Ladino (grater) – that refers to the decorative imprint that was traditionally made on the scone with a grater.

Boyikos de kezo are best eaten warm, freshly baked with some crumbly Greek feta cheese and olives at teatime or at brunch. They are customarily served after the Fast of Tishah B'Av and for the festival Shavuot.

Ingredients: 
SCONES
1 1/2 cups cake flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
A large pinch of salt
3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
3/4 cup coarsely grated kefalotiri or Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup full-fat milk or cream
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/3 cup vegetable oil
.................................................
EGG WASH
2 egg yolks, lightly beaten, mixed with 1 tablespoon milk
.................................................
TOPPING
3 tablespoons finely grated kefalotiri or Parmesan cheese
Directions: 
  • Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line two large baking trays with baking paper.
  • In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt, and stir in the cheeses. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and pour in the milk or cream, egg and oil. Mix the ingredients together with a spatula until well combined.
  • ​Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly. Do not overwork the dough. Roll into about 30 walnut-size balls with your hands and flatten slightly.
  • Arrange the scones on the baking trays 2.5cm (1in) apart. Brush the tops with the egg wash and sprinkle with grated cheese. Bake for 20 minutes or until lightly golden. Transfer to wire racks. Serve warm.

Reprinted with permission from Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the Mediterranean island of Rhodes © 2012 by Stella Cohen, The Gerald & Marc Hoberman Collection. Photography by Marc Hoberman.

Sephardic cuisine expert, artist, textile designer, and cookery writer, Stella Cohen is a passionate ambassador for the Jewish community, dedicating her life to the celebration, preservation, and education of Sephardic values and traditions. Stella’s heart lies in Southern Africa as well as in the Mediterranean, as she was born and raised in Zimbabwe and has a family tree entrenched in Sephardic history. Her parents originate from Rhodes, Greece, and Marmaris, Turkey and she is the great-granddaughter of Yaacov Capouya, the Rabbi of Rhodes.

Tina's Tidbits: 

Stella’s Hints

  • In Turkey, 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes are added to the dough for a spicy bite.
  • To freeze baked scones: Open-freeze on a plastic wrap-lined tray. Store in an airtight container and freeze for up to 1 month. To serve, defrost in the container for 1-2 hours. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C) and reheat the scones on a baking tray for 10 minutes.

Fragrant Rice Flour and Milk Pudding

By: 
Stella Cohen

Called sutlach by the Sephardic communities of Turkey and Greece, this is a light but nourishing rice pudding. Traditionally it is served on Friday night, after Saturday Sabbath morning services, as part of the meal breaking the fast on Yom Kippur, and for the Jewish festival of Shavuot. My mother would make individual bowls of sutlach and sprinkle my sister’s and my initials on the top using ground cinnamon, a practice my children and grandchildren also love.

In this recipe from Rhodes, ground rice flour is used, which gives the dessert a gloriously creamy texture. It is infused with rose water and sprinkled with ground cinnamon. Though easy to make, this pudding requires a little patience as it takes about 15 minutes of constant stirring over very low heat to thicken. There is a quicker alternative using cornstarch, which I describe below. I prefer sutlach chilled alongside fresh berries.

Ingredients: 
PUDDING
4 heaping tablespoons ground rice flour
1/2 cup water
4 cups whole milk
3 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar, or to taste
1 tablespoon rose water or vanilla extract
..............................................................................
TOPPING
Ground cinnamon
..............................................................................
ADDITIONAL TOPPINGS (optional)
Blanched almonds, toasted
Pistachios, coarsely chopped
Coconut, desiccated
Grenadine syrup
Rose petal preserve
Directions: 

Equipment:  4 small, shallow heatproof bowls or 6 ramekins.

  • Blend the rice flour and water in a small bowl and stir until smooth.
  • Combine the milk and sugar in a large, deep, heavy-based pan and set over a medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently using a balloon whisk. When the milk comes to a boil, remove from the heat. Stir the rice flour mixture into the milk. Return the pan to the heat, stirring continuously for 2 minutes, and then reduce to a medium heat. Continue stirring in the same direction for about 15 minutes or until the pudding thickens and heavily coats the back of a spoon. Be sure to stir constantly and scrape the bottom and sides of the pan as this prevents the pudding from forming lumps and catching to the bottom of the pan. Remove from the heat and stir in the rose water or vanilla extract.
  • Strain the pudding into a jug and pour immediately into individual serving bowls or ramekins. Seal each bowl with plastic wrap to prevent a skin forming.
  • Serve at room temperature or chilled, sprinkled with ground cinnamon.

    Reprinted with permission from Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the Mediterranean island of Rhodes © 2012 by Stella Cohen, The Gerald & Marc Hoberman Collection. Photography by Marc Hoberman.

    Sephardic cuisine expert, artist, textile designer, and cookery writer, Stella Cohen is a passionate ambassador for the Jewish community, dedicating her life to the celebration, preservation, and education of Sephardic values and traditions. Stella’s heart lies in Southern Africa as well as in the Mediterranean, as she was born and raised in Zimbabwe and has a family tree entrenched in Sephardic history. Her parents originate from Rhodes, Greece, and Marmaris, Turkey and she is the great-granddaughter of Yaacov Capouya, the Rabbi of Rhodes.

Tina's Tidbits: 

Stella's Twists on Tradition

  • You can use 3 tablespoons cornstarch in place of the rice flour. This takes no more than about 5 minutes to cook.
  • For a piney flavor, crush 1 mastic crystal to a powder with 1 teasooon caster sugar and stir in very quickly when the heat is turned off.
  • Toppings: Substitute the cinnamon with toasted blanched almonds, coarsely chopped pistachios or desiccated coconut, and a little grenadine syrup poured on the top for a splash of deep pink colour. Rose petal preserve, found at Greek or Middle Eastern stores, is heavenly swirled in the pudding.

Swiss Chard, Potato and Cheese Gratin

By: 
Stella Cohen

This delicious gratin is known also known as quajado di pasi kon patata i keso (sfongo) in Ladino.

Swiss chard gratin of Turkish origin is characterized with small mounds of mashed potato and cheese mixture interspersed in a bed of Swiss chard, egg, cheese, and potato. It is traditionally served during Passover week, on Rosh HaShanah, and for the festival of Shavout. Served piping hot, this makes a wholesome light family meal.

Ingredients: 
GRATIN
1 pound 2 ounces (500 grams) Swiss chard (silverbeet), stalks removed, washed, and finely shredded
1 pound 2 ounces (500 grams) potatoes, unpeeled
7 eggs, lightly beaten
1 1/2 cups freshly grated kashkaval or Parmesan cheese mixed with 1/2 cup crumbled feta
sea salt
white pepper, finely ground
..............................................................
IN SEPARATE BOWL
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon milk
..............................................................
TOPPING
1/3 cup grated kashkaval or Parmesan cheese
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
..............................................................
Directions: 
  • Brush a 14 x 10-inch (35 x 25 cm) earthenware ovenproof dish with oil.
  • Dry the Swiss chard in batches in a salad spinner. Spread out the shredded chard on kitchen towels and pat gently ensuring that it is thoroughly dry. I like to do this step the night before so the leaves dry thoroughly.
  • Put the potatoes in a pan with enough cold salted water to just cover. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and simmer for 30-40 minutes or until tender when pierced with a knife. Drain and, whilst still hot (using a fork to hold the potato steady and tongs to peel off the skin), peel and return to the pan for about 1 minute to dry off any excess moisture. Put through a potato ricer. Divide the potato mixture into two thirds and set aside the remaining third.
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF (180ºC) and heat the oiled dish in the oven for 5 minutes.
  • In a very large bowl, and using your hands, mix the Swiss chard with two-thirds of the mashed potato and 1 1/2 cups of grated mixed cheese, salt, and pepper. When evenly incorporated add the 7 beaten eggs and combine well.
  • In another bowl, combine the remaining third of the mashed potato with 2 beaten eggs, the remaining 1/2 cup mixed cheeses and the milk. Season with salt and pepper. Mix well.
  • Remove the heated dish from the oven and spread the Swiss chard and potato mixture evenly into the dish.
  • With a spoon, scoop out golf ball-sized hollows in the layer of the Swiss chard and potato mixture spacing them evenly in rows about 1 inch (2.5cm) apart. Fill with teaspoonfuls of the potato and cheese mixture, forming small mounds.
  • Sprinkle the gratin with cheese and dot with a few small knobs of butter. Bake for 50 minutes or until the top is crusty and golden brown. Serve directly from the dish, hot or cold, cut into squares.

Reprinted with permission from Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the Mediterranean island of Rhodes © 2012 by Stella Cohen, The Gerald & Marc Hoberman Collection. Photography by Marc Hoberman.

Sephardic cuisine expert, artist, textile designer, and cookery writer, Stella Cohen is a passionate ambassador for the Jewish community, dedicating her life to the celebration, preservation, and education of Sephardic values and traditions. Stella’s heart lies in Southern Africa as well as in the Mediterranean, as she was born and raised in Zimbabwe and has a family tree entrenched in Sephardic history. Her parents originate from Rhodes, Greece, and Marmaris, Turkey and she is the great-granddaughter of Yaacov Capouya, the Rabbi of Rhodes.
 

Stella's Hints

  • Use ricotta or fresh goat’s cheese instead of feta for a blander taste.
  • The volume of the trimmed Swiss chard seems large but it reduces significantly when cooked.

Jaroset (Panamanian Halek)

By: 
Tina Wasserman

​This Passover recipe comes from Rita Sasso, a Panamanian whose roots go back to Spain via Amsterdam and Curaçao, which had a significant Jewish population in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Rita and I became pen pals when I published a recipe in my Reform Judaism magazine column that was given to me by a friend in Mexico... and she recognized the recipe as her own! We have shared recipes ever since, and here is one she gave me with her permission to publish.

Ingredients: 
4 ounces dried figs
4 ounces raisins
4 ounces prunes
4 ounces pitted dates
1 1/2 cups peanut butter or almond butter
2–3 cups brown sugar, according to taste
1/2 cup sweet Passover wine, as needed
Cinnamon, enough to cover the balls of charoset (approximately 1 1/2 ounces)
Directions: 
  1. Place the dried fruits in a processor work bowl and process until a relatively smooth paste is formed.
  2. Add the peanut butter and brown sugar to the processor work bowl and pulse on and off a few times to begin to combine the ingredients. The machine will only begin the process, as the mixture will be thick.
  3. Remove the mixture to a bowl, and continue to combine the ingredients, kneading with your hands.
  4. Little by little add the wine to the mixture until you obtain a firm ball of fruit. This mixture will be quite sticky. If necessary, refrigerate for 1/2 hour until the mixture firms up a little.
  5. Wet your hands periodically with cold water and form small balls of charoset about the size of a small walnut.
  6. Place the balls on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and put them in the freezer until frozen.
  7. Once the balls are hard, you can remove them to a freezer bag until needed.
  8. Just before serving, defrost and roll each ball in cinnamon. Serve.
 
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • Do not double this recipe unless you have a very large food processor or the mixture will be too difficult to combine thoroughly.
  • Because of the strong Sephardic influence in Central America, peanuts are often found in foods for Passover. Observant Ashkenazic Jews will not eat peanuts during Passover so almond butter makes a good substitute in this recipe.

Bread Kugel with Dried Fruit and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

By: 
Tina Wasserman

This recipe - perfect for using as a stuffing for your Thanksgiving meal  - is featured in Tina Wasserman's newest book, Entree to Judaism for Families filled with tools to help children learn to cook with confidence, with clear, step-by-step instructions for every recipe and tips for adults to make the experience safe and rewarding.

The first bread kugels made eight hundred years ago probably didn’t have more than a few raisins in them. They definitely didn’t have sun-dried tomatoes, since tomatoes were first brought to Europe from the Americas in the sixteenth century! This recipe combines many of the flavors and foods found in Spain and Portugal (the home of Sephardic Jews) with the classic technique for making a bread kugel.

Ingredients: 
3 tablespoons olive oil, plus additional for greasing the pan
1 onion, diced
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 cup chopped mushrooms
½ cup chopped mixed dried fruit (apples, prunes, pears, apricots, or any of your other favorites)
½ cup dried sweetened cranberries
1 cup apricot nectar
¼ cup Madeira (optional; add more apricot nectar if not using)
¼ cup sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, drained and chopped
½ cup toasted almonds, coarsely chopped
1 loaf of white bread or challah with crust, cut into ½-inch cubes (about 7 cups)
1 teaspoon dried thyme
½ teaspoon crushed rosemary
½ teaspoon sage
¼ teaspoon marjoram
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
Kosher salt and 10 grindings of pepper to taste
1½ cups chicken broth, warm or at room temperature
1 egg
Directions: 
  1. Sauté the onion in the olive oil until lightly golden. Add the celery and mushrooms, and sauté for about 10 minutes or until the vegetables are soft and have given up their juices. Set aside.
  2. Grease a 2-quart casserole or 11½ x 8-inch pan with some additional olive oil.
  3. Combine the chopped dried fruit, dried cranberries, apricot nectar, and Madeira in a small glass bowl, and microwave on high for 2 minutes. Set aside.
  4. Combine the sun-dried tomatoes, almonds, and bread cubes in a 4-quart bowl.
  5. Mix the seasonings with the chicken broth and egg. Set aside.
  6. Add the onion mixture and the dried fruit/juice mixture to the bowl with the bread cubes and toss.
  7. Add the broth and egg mixture, and stir until the mixture is very moist and almost runny. If necessary, add a little more broth or nectar.
  8. Pour the mixture into the prepared casserole, and bake at 350°F for 30–40 minutes.

Note

The casserole can be baked for the first 25 minutes covered with foil, shiny side up. Then remove the foil for the remainder of the cooking time. This will give you a very soft stuffing.

Kitchen Conversations

  • Do you think the Jews of Eastern Europe would use apricots and other dried fruits or apples,pears, and raisins? Why? 
  • Using popular, modern ingredients such as Madeira and sun-dried tomatoes along with dried cranberries in this classic form of kugel shows how recipes change over time with access to new and/or different available ingredients. Are there any family recipes that your relatives have changed because they couldn’t find a certain ingredient or because they liked one food more than another?
  • How would you change this recipe to include ingredients you like that are available where you live?
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • Don’t be put off by the number of ingredients. Each step can be worked on independently over the course of the day, covered, and then all combined before baking.
  • Cream sherry or additional apricot nectar can be substituted for the Madeira if you prefer.
  • Eliminating the sun-dried tomatoes reduces saltiness, so adjust the seasonings accordingly if you don’t include them.
  • You may substitute 2 teaspoons of poultry seasoning mix for the individual herbs if you prefer.

Mina de Maza [Matzah Pie]

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Recipes for matzah lasagna or matzah pies are common in American Jewish cookbooks, but these foods are not inventions of the American Jewish kitchen. Throughout the Mediterranean, Turkish minas, Italian scacchi, and Greek pitas – all layered dishes similar to lasagna – have been prepared for at least a thousand years, substituting matzah for dough during Passover. The following is a variation of the classic Turkish mina and a meatless scacchi

Ingredients: 
SPINACH FILLING
2 tablespoons roasted pine nuts
2 tablespoons butter, plus additional butter for greasing the pan
1 medium onion, finely diced
1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach, defrosted
1/2 pound feta cheese, crumbled
7 1/2 ounces Friendship farmer cheese (pot cheese)
2 eggs, lightly beaten
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4-1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, to taste
1 tablespoon minced fresh dill
.........................................................................
MUSHROOM-ARTICHOKE MIX-IN
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 large clove of garlic, finely minced
8 ounces sliced mushrooms, any variety, including Shiitake, Crimini, Baby Portobellos, Oyster, Porcini
8 ounces defrosted artichoke hearts
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
6 regular matzah squares
2 cups warm vegetable or mushroom broth
1 egg
.........................................................................
TOPPING
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Directions: 
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Lightly grease a 13" x 9" pan with the additional butter. Set aside.
  3. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a 2-quart pan. Sauté the onion until golden.
  4. Squeeze out all of the excess moisture from the spinach with your hands and add to the onions, then cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until most of the moisture has evaporated. Mix in the feta, farmer cheese, eggs, seasonings, and dill, and then set aside.
  5. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a small sauté pan and add the garlic. Cook for 20 seconds over medium high heat, and then mix in the mushrooms, sautéing them for about 5 minutes, until they have given up most of their moisture.
  6. If the artichoke pieces are large, cut them in half. Add to the mushroom mixture and stir to heat through. Mix in the toasted pine nuts and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  7. Heat the 2 cups of broth in the microwave for about 1 1/2 minutes. Pour into an 8-inch square casserole or a deep dish that will hold the liquid and soak 2 sheets of matzah at a time until they are soft and pliable. Once you have 4 soft matzot, fit them into the bottom and sides of the buttered dish.
  8. Spread the spinach mixture over the matzot, then top with the mushroom mixture.
  9. Soak the remaining 4 sheets of matzah in the broth and then cover the filling, trimming or tucking in the sides.
  10. Add the remaining egg to the leftover broth in the dish (note: if no broth is left, combine 1/2 cup broth with the egg) and pour it evenly over the entire casserole.
  11. Sprinkle the Parmesan cheese over the top and bake for 35-45 minutes until golden brown and bubbling. Serve hot or at room temperature.
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • To enhance the flavor of nuts, roast them in a 325°F oven for 5-7 minutes until fragrant.
  • Always sauté onions alone for part of their cooking time. This will caramelize the natural sugars that make fried onions sweet.
  •  One 10-ounce package of frozen chopped spinach is equal to 1 pound of fresh spinach. You don't have to wash, de-stem, or chop the frozen variety.

Today the compliment "worth your salt" might be cause for a smile, but in ancient times the same saying was cause for celebration!

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