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Carrot Kugel

By: 
Pat Tolkoff of Temple B'nai Or Sisterhood

This colorful and tasty carrot kugel is a great holiday dish, and a good substitute for potatoes or rice.

Ingredients: 
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup margarine or unsalted butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
2 cups grated carrots (about 5-6 medium)
1/2 orange, grated rind and juice
2 unbeaten eggs
Directions: 
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Sift together the four dry ingredients.
  3. Cream shortening and sugar in large bowl. Add carrots, eggs, rind, and juice to creamed mixture, and mix well.  Mixture will look slightly curdled.
  4. Gradually add dry ingredients to creamed mixture and mix well.
  5. Bake in 1 1/2-quart casserole, uncovered for 45-50 minutes.

Note: Use margarine instead of butter if serving with a meat entrée.

Butternut Squash in Sweet and Sour Sauce (Zucca Gialla in Agrodolce)

By: 
Tina Wasserman

I first saw this dish in Joyce Goldstein’s Cucina Ebraica. I was intrigued by the flavor combinations. The sweet-and-sour flavoring is so much a part of the Jewish culinary culture, and the use of vinegar implies that this dish was made in advance for the Sabbath day meal. The following is an adaptation of Joyce’s recipe.

Ingredients: 
2 pounds butternut squash
2–3 tablespoons olive oil, or as needed
Kosher salt as needed
1/2 cup chiffonade of fresh mint
2 large cloves of garlic, sliced lengthwise into thin slivers
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar or red wine vinegar
1/2 cup sugar (less if using balsamic vinegar)
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Directions: 
  1. Cut the squash in half lengthwise, peel it, andremove all seeds and fibers from the inside. Cut each half lengthwise again and slice crosswise into 1/4-inch slices.
  2. Toss the squash slices with 2 tablespoons of olive oil to coat, and place the squash slices on a nonstick cookie sheet or roasting pan. Sprinkle very lightly with some kosher salt.
  3. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes at 400° F or until squash is tender but firm – if the tip of a sharp knife is easily inserted and removed from the squash, it is done.
  4. Layer the cooked squash with the mint and garlic slivers in a serving dish.
  5. Pour any pan drippings from the squash into an 8-inch nonstick sauté pan. If there is very little oil, add 1 tablespoon of olive oil to the pan. Heat on medium for 10 seconds.
  6. Add the balsamic vinegar and sugar first to dissolve, and then add the cinnamon to the pan. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture bubbles and thickens slightly, about 4 minutes.
  7. Pour the hot syrup over the squash, and gently move and lift the squash with a rubber spatula or large plastic serving spoon (these utensils won’t cut into the pieces of squash) to distribute the sauce evenly.
  8. Serve at once or at room temperature, which is perfect for a buffet.
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • To chiffonade a leafy herb, layer 5–10 leaves on top of each other, and roll the leaves tightly together into a long log like a cigarette. Cutting across the log, make thin slices. When you are done, there will be thin strands of herb that almost float when you toss them in the air – hence the reference to chiffon!
  • Balsamic vinegar is made from white trebbiano grapes. The juice is allowed to age in different types and sizes of wood barrels that impart the special sweet-tart flavor to the vinegar.

Pumpkin Ravioli from Mantua

By: 
Tina Wasserman

During the Renaissance the Jews lived very well in Mantua under the Gonzaga duchy. They were very familiar with pumpkin because of New World exploration and the Portuguese and Converso connections throughout the world. Although this dish is very popular in restaurants throughout the world right now, the recipe is 500 years old. This recipe was adapted from Joyce Goldstein’s cookbook, Cucina Ebraica.

Ingredients: 
FILLING:
2 pounds fresh pie pumpkin or butternut squash, or 1 pound canned pumpkin puree
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1 cup Italian amaretti cookies (about 2 ounces), crushed
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 cup finely chopped raisins (soaked in hot water for 15 minutes if too dry and hard)
Sugar to taste
1 egg
2 tablespoons dried plain bread crumbs
1 egg yolk mixed with 2 tablespoons water for sealing dough
1 stick butter melted, until light brown
1/4 cup chiffonade of fresh mint or fresh thyme
...................................................................................................
DOUGH:
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons ice water
2 cups bread flour
Directions: 

Filling

  1. To prepare the pumpkin or squash, roast in a 400°F oven for 50 minutes or until soft. Cool, cut in half, and remove all seeds and stringy fibers. Scoop the meat of the squash into a bowl and mash with a fork until smooth.
  2. If puree is watery, spread the puree on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake at 300°F for 10 minutes or until it appears dry. Let cool before using, or use 1 pound of canned pumpkin.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the pumpkin with the next 7 ingredients and set aside while you make the dough.

Dough

  1. Place the eggs, oil, and water in the food processor work bowl, and mix by turning the processor on and off twice.
  2. Add 1 cup of the bread flour, and turn the processor on for 5 seconds. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the other cup of flour and process for 10 seconds longer. The dough will be crumbly. Pinch a little bit of dough; if it holds together, it is ready to be rolled.
  3. Remove the dough and divide in half. Place on a lightly floured surface, cover, and allow to rest for 10 minutes or longer if you are rolling the dough by hand.
  4. Make pasta according to machine directions. If rolling pasta by hand, divide dough into fourths and then roll out each portion as thin as possible. Cut dough into 3-inch rounds, or use a ravioli form.
  5. Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of each circle or each template on the ravioli form. Brush a little of the egg yolk mixture on the edges of the dough, and cover with another circle of dough (or sheet if using the ravioli plate). Press dough firmly from the filling outward to remove any air trapped in the middle and seal the dough.
  6. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add 1 tablespoon of oil. Cook pasta until al dente. Drain and place in a large serving bowl.
  7. Drizzle brown butter on top of ravioli, and sprinkle with the fresh mint or thyme chiffonade.

 

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • Although fresh pie pumpkin has a more distinct flavor, canned pumpkin will work if you are short on time.
  • Never use salt in the pasta dough. It will make the dough tough and hard to roll.

Sweet Potato–Pumpkin Cazuela (Casserole)

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Here’s a dish that is perfect for Sukkot and Thanksgiving and very easy, especially if you use canned potatoes and pumpkins. Pumpkins are believed to have originated in North America between 7000 and 5500 b.c.e. Although prevalent in the Far East, pumpkins gained popularity in Europe beginning in the sixteenth century after their discovery in the New World.

Substitute pareve margarine for the butter for a dairy-free dish. Don’t be afraid of the coconut milk. It is very subtle and rounds out the flavors.

 

Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons unsalted butter or pareve margarine
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup unsweetened canned coconut milk
2 eggs
One 15-ounce can unflavored pumpkin puree or 1 small pie pumpkin
One 29-ounce can of yams in light syrup, drained and mashed, or 3 large yams
1/4 cup water
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
2-inch piece of stick cinnamon, broken into pieces
1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
3 whole cloves
Directions: 
  1. Place the butter or margarine in a 2-quart glass bowl and microwave for 45 seconds.
  2. Whisk the sugars, flour, and salt into the butter to combine.
  3. Whisk the coconut milk into the mixture until thoroughly blended. Add the eggs and combine.
  4. Add the pumpkin puree and the mashed yams and whisk until a smooth batter is formed.
  5. Combine the water with the spices in a small glass cup and microwave on high for 11/2 minutes. Let the mixture steep for 5 minutes. Strain the spiced water through a fine-mesh strainer into the pumpkin-potato mixture and stir to incorporate.
  6. Butter a 2-quart casserole and pour the mixture into the prepared dish.
  7. Bake covered in a preheated 350°F oven for 1 hour. Serve.
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • Always use a small sugar pie pumpkin when cooked pumpkin is called for. Larger pumpkins are more watery and more like acorn squash.
  • To cook a pumpkin, cut into large chunks, peel, and cook in boiling salted water until tender—about 20 minutes. Drain and mash.
  • Coconut milk is not milk or dairy. It is the liquid formed from ground, fresh, hydrated coconut.
  • This dish freezes beautifully! Just cool completely before freezing so no ice crystals form. Defrost and reheat in the microwave.

Barbecued Pizza

By: 
Deborah Rood Goldman

Make Shabbat dinner a family activity with this recipe — after adults do the grilling, let kids do the decorating. Combine fresh mozzarella with summer fresh tomatoes and herbs on a pizza crust that's cooked on the grill. 

Ingredients: 
1 15-ounce bag refrigerated pizza dough
Flour to sprinkle
2 teaspoons oregano, fresh or dried
1 cup tomato or marinara sauce (optional)
2 to 3 fresh tomatoes, thinly sliced
6 to 8 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese (pre-sliced is easy to work with)
grilled vegetables, sliced (zucchini, peppers, mushrooms, onions)
1 teaspoon fresh basil, torn into small pieces
Directions: 
  1. To make two 6-inch pizzas, divide dough into two equal pieces. Shape into balls. Sprinkle flour lightly on your hands and rolling surface. Place one ball of dough on the floured surface. Flatten it with your hands, and then using rolling pin, roll dough from the center out in all directions to stretch it into a six-inch circle. Place dough on oiled pizza pan, and brush the top with olive oil.
  2. Place pan on hot grill, cook pizza rounds for 3 to 6 minutes until golden brown.  Flip dough over.
  3.  Pour 1/2 cup sauce (if using) on dough and gently spread it with bottom of a ladle. Sprinkle on 1 teaspoon oregano.
  4.  Place sliced tomatoes on top, followed by half of the fresh mozzarella cheese.
  5. Cook on grill for 5 to 10 minutes more, until brown on bottom, and cheese is melted. Top with sliced grilled veggies and fresh basil.
  6. Repeat with remaining dough.

Variation

  • For a low calorie salad pizza, follow through Step 3. Then cook additional time until golden brown,  remove from heat and top with fresh tossed salad.
  • Add capers and black olives.
Tina's Tidbits: 

Have a picky eater who isn't fond of vegetables? Have an assortment of veggies in little dishes and let picky eaters choose the ones they like to decorate their pizza. If they create it, there's a good chance they'll eat it. Plus, when you make it into a fun art project, the focus is on design, rather than content.

Eggplant Baladi

By: 
Orly Ziv

Eggplant is so popular year-round in Israel that it shows up in every restaurant, cookbook, and home kitchen in seemingly endless recipes. Eggplant is also a favorite in my household. I learned this recipe in a cooking class and it turned out to be a very successful dish with a surprising flavor combination. It is a wonderful use for date honey (called silan in Hebrew), which is very popular in the Israeli kitchen.

Ingredients: 
2 medium eggplants
2-3 garlic cloves, chopped
Sea salt
Juice of 1 lemon, or more to taste`
3 tablespoons tahini
3 teaspoons silan
Parsley leaves, chopped
Pine nuts, toasted
Pomegranate seeds
Directions: 
  1. Grill the eggplants over a flame, turning with tongs until soft and evenly charred. Alternately, roast the eggplants under a broiler.
  2. Cut a slit at the bottom of the eggplants and place in a sieve. Leave to drain.
  3. Remove peel, stem, and dark seeds from eggplants and place on a plate or small serving platter.
  4. Sprinkle the chopped garlic* and sea salt over the eggplants, then drizzle with lemon juice, tahini, and silan.
  5. Garnish with parsley, pine nuts, and pomegranage seeds, and serve.

*Tip: Remove the sprout in the center of each clove of garlic (called the "germ") to make it easier to digest.


Reprinted with permission from Cook in Israel: Home Cooking Inspiration by Orly Ziv. 

Savory Persian Herb and Cheese Hamantaschen

By: 
Amelia Saltsman

Hamantaschen, the traditional triangular Ashkenazic Purim pastries, are typically a sweet treat. I’ve taken a savory approach here, using spring herbs, a Persian favorite, to honor Esther and Mordechai’s heritage, as well as the season. With their flaky dough, these Haman’s hats (or pockets or ears) are reminiscent of bourekas, the small hand pies popular in Israel and the eastern Mediterranean. You can make snack-size hamantaschen or large ones for a vegetarian main dish (see the variation at the end of the recipe).

Ingredients: 
For the pastry:
1½ cups (190 g) unbleached all-purpose flour
½ cup (60 g) whole wheat flour
½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup (170 g) cold butter, cut into ½-inch (12-mm) pieces
½ cup (120 ml) ice water
For the filling:
1 bunch each Persian or regular mint, leek or garlic chives, pepper cress, green onions, and tarragon
¾ cup (170 g) labneh, homemade or store-bought
6 ounces (170 g) feta cheese, crumbled
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 egg, lightly beaten, for egg wash
Directions: 

To Make the Pastry

In a large bowl, stir together the flours and salt with a fork. Scatter the butter over the flour mixture and, using your fingertips or a pastry blender, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse sand with some flattened pieces of butter still visible. Stir in the ice water, a little at a time, until the dough just sticks together when pressed between your fingertips. Gather the dough into a ball, wrap in plastic wrap, and flatten into a thick rectangle. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes. (The dough can be made up to 3 days ahead and refrigerated; let it rest at room temperature until soft enough to roll out, about 15 minutes.)

To Make the Filling

Finely chop enough of each of the herbs in any combination preferred to total 1¼ cups (75 g) lightly packed. In a medium bowl, use a fork to mash together the labneh and feta. Stir in the egg, then stir in the chopped herbs.

To Assemble the Pastries

Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). Have ready 2 sheet pans. If you like, line them with parchment paper.

Divide the dough in half and rewrap and refrigerate half of it. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the other half into a rectangle or circle 1/16 to ⅛ inch (2 to 3 mm) thick. Cut out 12 circles each 3½ inches (9 cm) in diameter, rerolling any scraps as needed.

Mound 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of each dough circle. Fold the sides of the dough up over the filling to form a triangle, leaving a nickel-size bit of filling exposed. Pinch the three corners of the triangle very firmly to seal. Arrange the pastries on a sheet pan, spacing them about 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart. Refrigerate the first batch while you make more with the remaining half of the dough and filling. Top off the pastries with any leftover filling. Brush the pastries with the egg wash.

Bake the pastries for 12 minutes; the bottoms will be light golden. Reduce heat to 375°F (190°C) and continue to bake until the crust is a rich gold and the filling is puffed and browned in places, 10 to 12 minutes longer. Using an offset spatula, transfer the pastries to a wire rack and let cool for 5 to 10 minutes before serving. Refrigerate leftover hamantaschen; they can be reheated in a 350°F (180°C).

Main Dish Variation

To make 6 large hamantaschen, cut three 6-inch (15-cm) circles from each piece of dough. Use about ⅓ cup (70 g) of filling for each dough circle and fold as directed. As you complete shaping each hamantasch, use a wide offset spatula to move it onto the baking sheet. Bake at 425°F (220°C) for 15 minutes and at 375°F (190°C) for about 25 minutes.

Kitchen Note

Unbaked hamantaschen can be frozen, well wrapped, for up to 1 week. Brush frozen pastries with egg wash just before baking, and increase oven times to 15 and 18 minutes, respectively.

Reprinted with permission from The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen © 2015 by Amelia Saltsman, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photo by Staci Valentine.

Persian Spinach and Pine Nut Kuku

By: 
Tina Wasserman

This recipe is featured in Tina Wasserman's newest book, Entrée to Judaism for Families, filled with tools to help children learn to cook with confidence, with clear, step-by-step instructions for every recipe and tips for adults to make the experience safe and rewarding.

Kuku might sound like a silly name, but it is a delicious omelet-like pancake made in Iran. Before 1935, Iran was called Persia, and Jewish people have lived in Persia for almost twenty-five hundred years! When King Solomon’s Temple was destroyed in 586 BCE, thousands of Jews were exiled to Babylonia, which at that time included the lands of Persia. The story of Purim takes place in Persia, in the city of Shushan.

Kuku are light and fluffy and often contain vegetables and green herbs. Here are two recipes, one using cauliflower and this one with spinach. This recipe for kuku combines some of the foods that the Moors brought from Persia and the Middle East and introduced to Jewish people living in Spain. When, in 1492, the Jews were no longer allowed to live in Spain, they brought their love of spinach, raisins, and pine nuts with them to Italy. Persians introduced the Moors to spinach, and cauliflower was introduced to Persian cuisine from neighboring Asia Minor (present-day Turkey). After the Moors conquered Spain, they introduced the vegetables to the Jews, and along with raisins, they were favored by the Spanish Moors and Jews for centuries. Although the Jews were exiled from Spain in 1492, their cooking traditions continued. So whenever you see a recipe that combines raisins with spinach or cauliflower, you can tell that it is a dish with Jewish connections!

Najmieh Batmanglij is my (and most Americans’) go-to authority on Persian cuisine. Her recipes inspired me to create the following.

Kuku can be served hot out of the oven, at room temperature, or cold. This is a perfect recipe to make with children because it can be served whenever you have time to eat it as a snack or rewarmed as a light lunch or brunch dish.

Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, defrosted
¼ cup toasted pine nuts
¼ cup raisins
½ cup finely chopped chives or the green part of scallions
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
10 grindings of black pepper or to taste
1 teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon Persian advieh, baharat, or cinnamon
1 pinch of nutmeg
5 eggs
2 tablespoons matzah meal
Directions: 
  1. Add all of the oil to the pan and coat well. The excess oil will help cook the kuku.
  2. Place the defrosted chopped spinach in a colander. Take small handfuls of the spinach and squeeze very hard until almost all of the moisture has drained. Place the spinach in a medium bowl.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients to the spinach, and mix with a fork until the mixture is well combined.
  4. Pour into the prepared pan and place on the middle shelf of the oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until the top of the kuku begins to brown.
  5. Remove from the oven, cool, and cut into 1-inch squares.

Kitchen Conversations

Create your own kuku. What vegetable or vegetables would you like to use? What spices would make it taste good?

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • This is a good recipe to introduce cooking at the stove because the mixture won’t spatter and scare a young child.
  • It is very important that the child be standing on a stable surface—chairs are not appropriate!
  • Make sure that the stove is at least at midriff height. Faces should be far away from cooking utensils.
  • Hot casseroles should be removed from the oven by an adult or a supervised child over the age of ten.

Persian Cauliflower and Raisin Kuku

By: 
Tina Wasserman

This recipe is featured in Tina Wasserman's newest book, Entrée to Judaism for Families, filled with tools to help children learn to cook with confidence, with clear, step-by-step instructions for every recipe and tips for adults to make the experience safe and rewarding.

Kuku might sound like a silly name, but it is a delicious omelet-like pancake made in Iran. Before 1935, Iran was called Persia, and Jewish people have lived in Persia for almost twenty-five hundred years! When King Solomon’s Temple was destroyed in 586 BCE, thousands of Jews were exiled to Babylonia, which at that time included the lands of Persia. The story of Purim takes place in Persia, in the city of Shushan.

Kuku are light and fluffy and often contain vegetables and green herbs. Here are two recipes, one using spinach and this one with cauliflower. Persians introduced the Moors to spinach, and cauliflower was introduced to Persian cuisine from neighboring Asia Minor (present-day Turkey). After the Moors conquered Spain, they introduced the vegetables to the Jews, and along with raisins, they were favored by the Spanish Moors and Jews for centuries. Although the Jews were exiled from Spain in 1492, their cooking traditions continued. So whenever you see a recipe that combines raisins with spinach or cauliflower, you can tell that it is a dish with Jewish connections!

Najmieh Batmanglij is my (and most Americans’) go-to authority on Persian cuisine. Her recipes inspired me to create the following.

Kuku can be served hot out of the oven, at room temperature, or cold. This is a perfect recipe to make with children because it can be served whenever you have time to eat it as a snack or rewarmed as a light lunch or brunch dish.

Ingredients: 
20-ounce bag frozen cauliflower (or ½ head of large cauliflower)
2 medium onions
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided use
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
2 small cloves of garlic, finely chopped or put through a garlic press
5 large eggs
Freshly ground black pepper, about 15 turns of a pepper mill
½ teaspoon turmeric
½ teaspoon cumin
3 tablespoons dark raisins
Directions: 
  1. If the cauliflower is fresh, then chop into small pieces; if frozen, defrost and drain in a colander. Cut the onions in half top to bottom and then thinly slice. You should have about 4 cups.
  2. Heat a large frying pan on high for 15 seconds. Add 3 tablespoons of oil and heat for 10 seconds more. Lower the heat to medium. Add the cauliflower, onions, and salt to the pan, stir to combine, coverthe pan, and then cook for 3 minutes.
  3.  Uncover the pan and sauté until the cauliflower is soft and the onions are light golden brown. Add the garlic, and cook 1 minute more. Do not burn the garlic.
  4. Transfer the cauliflower/onion mixture to a large mixing bowl, and mash with a potato masher until the cauliflower becomes a coarse puree. Set aside.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 1½-quart casserole or 10-inch glass pie plate with the additional 2 tablespoons of oil.
  6. Using a fork, combine the eggs, pepper, turmeric, cumin, and raisins in a 1-quart bowl to the cauliflower and mix to thoroughly combine. 
  7. Pour the egg mixture into the greased casserole or pie plate, and bake on the center shelf of the oven for 30 minutes or until the top is golden and the eggs are cooked in the center. Serve immediately or at room temperature.

Note: Cut the cooled kuku into 1-inch squares, and place on a plate with toothpicks for bite-sized snacks or appetizers during the seder or anytime you need hors d’oeuvres.

Kitchen Conversations

Create your own kuku. What vegetable or vegetables would you like to use? What spices would make it taste good?

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • This is a good recipe to introduce cooking at the stove because the mixture won’t spatter and scare a young child.
  • It is very important that the child be standing on a stable surface—chairs are not appropriate!
  • Make sure that the stove is at least at midriff height. Faces should be far away from cooking utensils.
  • Hot casseroles should be removed from the oven by an adult or a supervised child over the age of ten.

Potato Onion Kugel

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Potato kugel did not become popular until the nineteenth century, when potatoes were grown throughout Europe and Western Russia. By the end of that century, the poor were eating potatoes two or more times a day! However, on Shabbat, even poor Jews found an extra egg, onion, and possibly some pepper to raise the lowly potato to new heights.

When Jewish immigrants came to North America, they brought the poptato recipes they knew and loved with them. Even the popular potato knish of today is a variation of the Shabbat potato kugel brought here over one hundred year ago.

Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons rendered chicken fat or extra virgin olive oil
3 medium onions, diced into 1/2-inch pieces (6 cups total)
3 pounds unpeeled California long white or Yukon Gold potatoes (about 12 small)
2 1/2 cups matzah farfel
8 large eggs
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
25 grindings of black pepper or to taste
Additional chicken fat or olive oil for greasing pan and top
Directions: 
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Heat a 10- or 12-inch skillet on high for 15 seconds. Add olive oil and chicken fat, and heat until the fat is melted.
  3. Add the onions and stir to coat with the fat mixture. Cover the pan and cook on medium high for 5 minutes.
  4. Remove the cover and sauté the onions for 3 more minutes until just beginning to turn golden.
  5. Grate the potatoes using the fine grating disk on your food processor or a medium grater if shredding by hand, and immediately put in a colander.
  6. Run water through the potatoes to remove starch and whiten them. Press down on the potatoes and drain thoroughly. Set aside.
  7. Place the matzah farfel in a 4-quart bowl. Cover with warm water and let rest for 3 minutes or until the farfel is soft. If any water remains, drain throoughly. Add the eggs, salt, and pepper to the farfel and beat with a fork until well combined. Add the sautéed onion and mix again.
  8. Add the grated potato. Use your hand and a fork to work the potatoes into the mixture until all the ingredients are evenly mixed. The mixture might look dry at first, but soon it will appear moist and pourable.
  9. Grease a 13 x 9-inch (3-quart) glass casserole with a little chicken fat (or olive oil). Pour in the potato mixture, and lightly spread it evenly with the fork. Do not pack down the potato mixture.
  10. Put an additional tablespoon of chicken fat or oil in your hand and rub the oil evenly over the top of the potatoes in the pan.
  11. Cover the pan with aluminum foil, dull-side up. Bake for 25 minutes. Remove the foil and continue to bake another 25-30 minutes or until the top is golden and the kugel is firm to the touch. If the kugel is done but hasn't browned, you may place it under the broiler until golden. 
Tina's Tidbits: 
  • California white or Yukon Gold potatoes are good to use when cooking with children. The hard flesh does not discolor as rapidly as a russet potato, and the skin is so thin that neither variety of potato requires peeling. No peeling means it's safer and more nutritious.
  • If you do not have a food processor, try to find a plastic, medium-holed grater if you are grating by hand. Children are less likely to cut their knuckles using a a hard plastic grater than a metal one.
  • Covering the pan with foil dull-side up helps the pan absorb heat faster while preventing the contents from drying out.

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