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Yom Kippur

As part of your ongoing journey in preparing for the High Holidays (the Days of Awe), here’s an activity that will engage you in discovering new ways to make discoveries and extend understanding beyond verbal and written modalities into the language of texture, rhythm, color, movement and sound.

As part of your journey in preparing for the High Holidays, also known as the Days of Awe, here’s an activity that will engage you in finding new ways to make discoveries, and extend understanding beyond verbal and written modalities into the language of texture, rhythm, color, movement and sound.

As part of your journey in preparing for the High Holidays, also known as the Days of Awe, here’s an activity that will engage you in finding new ways to make discoveries, and extend understanding beyond verbal and written modalities into the language of texture, rhythm, color, movement and sound.

I’m always interested in learning how others prepare for the High Holidays, also called the Days of Awe. I, myself, strive every day to learn more, do better and feel better. I have learned that I enter into this work from the inside out. While text supports and creates an integral piece of the foundation, my intentional learning and meaningful connection comes from a deeper place which informs and forms my foundation.

The High Holidays bring a special kind of panic upon Jewish families across the globe. Here's your guide to helping the holidays go more smoothly. 

Yom Kippur and toddlers don’t seem to go together very well. On the most solemn day of the calendar, it can be difficult to figure out what to do with a young child who isn’t ready to sit in services all day.

Take this quiz to test your knowledge about the Jewish High Holidays.

There are lots of reasons to come to High Holiday Day services. For some people, Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur are the days when they make their strongest annual act of identification with Judaism, with their congregation, and with the Jewish people. Attending these services is an act of identity

Rabbi Leora Kaye, Director of Program for the Union for Reform Judaism, explains the ritual of blowing the shofar

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