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Calendar

The Educational Value of Repetition

Leviticus, a priestly book, has as its primary focus an emphasis on the cleanliness of the community and its adherence to ritual matters for the sake of God’s blessings. … In the portion called, Emor, a significant redundancy occurs in the Hebrew text. We read that God said to Moses: Emor el hakohanim b’nei Aharon, ve-amarta aleihem… “Speak to the priests, the sons of Aaron, and you shall say to them…” (Leviticus 21:1).

D'var Torah By: 
Who Is Responsible to Teach the Next Generation?
Davar Acher By: 
Rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg

Rabbi Lyon in his commentary, beautifully discusses the double use of the verb emor/amarta as an injunction for parents to teach their children the ways of Torah and mitzvot. It’s a wonderful lesson, but what happens when parents fail to do so? 

From Blasphemy to Blasphemous: An Instructive Transition

In Parashat Emor, the Torah reports that a man born of mixed Israelite-Egyptian descent “blasphemed the Name [of God],” was placed on trial, and was stoned to death. A law was then enacted that anyone, Jewish or gentile, who blasphemes the name of God shall be put to death. Over time, in communities throughout the world, laws against blasphemy were put in place to address curses leveled at God as well as perceived slights against some religions. 

D'var Torah By: 
A Free People Receives Its First Holiday Calendar
Davar Acher By: 
Rabbi Jessica Zimmerman Graf

In this week’s Torah portion, Parashat Emor, we receive a framework for what will become the Jewish calendar. The holidays identified there are still observed today: Pesach, Shavuot, Sukkot, Rosh HaShanah, and Yom Kippur. Each of these holidays, as described in Emor, brings the community together, allows us to remember important events, and creates the opportunity for communication with God.

Is Time Ours or Is It God's?

In Parashat Emor, the verses in Leviticus 23:1-44 name and describe the sacred times of the Jewish calendar: Shabbat, Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur, and the Pilgrimage Festivals of Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot. Time becomes a holy thing, and the "normalcy" of time — of one day being no different than any other — is forever differentiated by the weekly Sabbath and by these special festive days.

D'var Torah By: 
Is Your Holy Time Becoming?
Davar Acher By: 
Rachel S. Mikva

Time is funny. It is relative: You may feel that time spent watching a sporting event flies by, but I will find it painfully long. It is fleeting: there is never enough time in a day to accomplish everything that needs doing. And time is fungible: all those uncompleted tasks will still be there tomorrow.

Emor: Words for the Next Generation

When the Rabbis divided the Torah into its 54 parashiyot (portions), they generally arranged for each portion to begin with a unique or otherwise significant word that would in some way su

D'var Torah By: 
Modern Lessons from Ancient Kohanim
Davar Acher By: 
Jessica Rosenthal

In Emor we find the laws concerning ancient priests.

What Would Moses Say?

In the Babylonian Talmud (M'nachot 29b) there is a wonderful midrash1 in which Moses is depicted as watching God sitting and writing crowns (embellishments that look a bit like

D'var Torah By: 
What Makes a Seder a Seder?
Davar Acher By: 
Jessica Rosenthal

As I read Robert Tornberg's d'var, I couldn't help but be reminded of a question I asked in graduate school: If one of our goals is to remain rooted in our traditional texts, can

Emor

How have men and women today inherited the roles and activities of the ancient priests?

D'var Torah By: 
Baking Holiness
Davar Acher By: 
Samuel M. Cohon

Each week my wife, a professor of British literature and Women's Studies, bakes challah.

Emor

How have men and women today inherited the roles and activities of the ancient priests?

D'var Torah By: 
Baking Holiness
Davar Acher By: 
Samuel M. Cohon

Each week my wife, a professor of British literature and Women's Studies, bakes challah.

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