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Kohelet

The Climax of Sukkot and the Profound Joy of the Journey

More than any other Jewish holiday or ritual, I love the audacity of Sukkot. After the many profound words and seemingly endless prayers of the High Holidays, Sukkot offers a very different holiday mode. The main theme and ultimate goal of the holiday is to achieve climactic joy throughout the holiday, including the intermediate days, which are known as Chol HaMo-eid Sukkot.

D'var Torah By: 
How to Experience God’s Wonders Anew
Davar Acher By: 
Rabbi Benjamin David

On the Shabbat that falls amid the holiday of Sukkot (Chol HaMo-eid Sukkot) we turn our attention to two distinct sections of Torah.... In the Exodus reading, taken from Parashat Ki Tisa, Moses asks to see God’s face, saying: “Oh, let me behold Your Presence!” (Ex. 33:18). While Moses cannot see God’s face, God reminds Moses (and us) that God can be felt, if not seen, in the “wonders” that God enacts for us and those around us (Ex .34:10).

The Sukkah and the Jewish Experience

In Leviticus, we are commanded to dwell in a sukkah for one week every year “in order that future generations may know that I made the Israelite people live in booths when I brought them out of the land of Egypt.” What does the sukkah teach us about the Jewish experience?

D'var Torah By: 
Connecting to the Holiness Within
Davar Acher By: 
Rabbi Lisa Silverstein Tzur

In preparation for the festival of Sukkot, we construct temporary structures, called sukkot, in which we honor the fragility and impermanence of life, and celebrate our devotion to God. We build these sukkot with love and ardent attention to detail, only to deconstruct them one week later. The temporal nature of the sukkah forces us to take advantage of the fleeting opportunity to rejoice in its shelter.

We All Will Die, But We Must Be Grateful

Sukkot is known in Rabbinic tradition as the "Festival of Our Joy" (Z'man Simchateinu, a name that derives from Leviticus 23:40: "You shall rejoice before the Eternal your God seven days"). Sukkot is the only festival for which the command to rejoice is given. It is a commandment — a mitzvah: us'mach'tem — "be happy!" 

D'var Torah By: 
The Sukkah and the Fragility of Peace
Davar Acher By: 
Neal Katz

Sukkot reminds me of the beautiful text of the Haskiveinu prayer in which we praise God for watching over us as we lie down for the evening. We also praise God for spreading over us a sukkah, or shelter, of peace. We close that prayer by blessing God, haporeis sukkat shalom aleinu, "whose shelter of peace is spread over us."

So, What’s the Point? Ecclesiastes and Chol HaMo-eid Sukkot

Chances are that many of us are familiar only with the section of Ecclesiastes that begins "To everything there is a season," only because we've heard it at a funeral or – thanks to the late

D'var Torah By: 
Finding a Hopeful Message in Kohelet
Davar Acher By: 
Brian I. Michelson

It is all useless, Kohelet said, it is all useless. Everything is useless. (Ecclesiastes 1:2)1

Sukkot: The Season of Our Joy

The Torah reading for the Shabbat of Sukkot (Exodus 33:12–34:26) includes the reconciliation between God and Moses following the Golden Calf, the inscription of the second set of the Ten Commandmen

D'var Torah By: 
Translating an Invitation to Relationship
Davar Acher By: 
Ilana Schwartzman

In the Torah portion for Chol HaMo-eid Sukkot, God commands Moses to, "Lead this people forward," (Exodus 33:12) through the wilderness.

To Everything There Is a Season: Turn, Turn, Turn to Kohelet (Ecclesiastes) this Sukkot

One of the privileges and responsibilities that I have as a congregational professional is serving on the faculty of the Union for Reform Judaism'

D'var Torah By: 
Finding Your Own “Happiness Project”
Davar Acher By: 
Melissa B. Simon

I've been slowly working my way through The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun

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