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Mount Nebo

Remember the Days of Old

In <em>Haazinu, </em>Moses recites a poem telling the people of Israel that they must give glory to God and be true to God whose ways are just. He instructs them to consult their elders and “remember the days of old.” 

D'var Torah By: 
The Times They Are A-Changin'
Davar Acher By: 
Rabbi Stefan Tiwy

In his d'var Torah on Parashat Haazinu, Rabbi Marc Saperstein makes the case that Moses' request to “remember the days of old” (Deuteronomy 32:7) literally obligates the Israelites and us, their spiritual descendants, to engage in the study of our people's history. At the same time, he acknowledges that history is neither an absolute nor infallible science.

A Failure of Leadership and Moses’ Downfall

Haazinu is one of the shorter sections of the Torah, and it is made up almost entirely of a breathtaking and chastening poem. The term "awesome" tends to be overused today, but this poem is truly awesome. Unfortunately, the power of the Hebrew rhythm and poetic style is lost in the English translation, but we can still sense some of the majesty.

D'var Torah By: 
Moses Reaches Out to Us Across the Generations
Davar Acher By: 
Paul Citrin

The poem in Haazinu presents divine attributes, affirms God's providential care and bounty; the place of the Jewish people in relation to God and the world; divine wrath; punishment and chastisement; treatment of Israel's enemies, and hope for the future of Israel. All of these topics in such a small space echo Abravanel's view, "The words of Torah sometimes seem few in quantity, but they are great in quality" (ibid., Itturei Torah).

There Is “No” Other

When I am preparing a family for the funeral of a loved one, we meet privately to recite the phrase Baruch Dayan HaEmet, "Blessed is the True Judge," as we put a tear in the black k'ri

D'var Torah By: 

Imagine you're an Israelite camped out across the Jordan River, poised to enter the Promised Land, and you hear Moses final appeal and farewell.

The Last Lecture: Moses's Valedictory Song

What would you say to the people you care about if you knew you were about to die? How would you choose and position your words to reflect your deepest commitments?

D'var Torah By: 
Unfinished Journeys
Davar Acher By: 
Eric Eisenkramer

In her d'var Torah, Rabbi Elwell describes Moses as a "weather-beaten, still powerful patriarch." He is an elderly, exhausted man, a man who fears

Haazinu: Nursing Them with Honey from the Rock

I've always thought it curious that it is customary on the holiday of Shavuot to eat foods made of sweet dairy (cheese blintzes, cheesecake, and so on).

D'var Torah By: 
The Song of Moses: Poetry, Prose, and Metaphor
Davar Acher By: 
Brad L. Bloom

Rabbi Milgrom brings out an intriguing dimension of the Song of Moses by focusing on the theme of the nurturing God in the language of the poem.

Moses’s Last Lecture

Give ear, O heavens, let me speak;
Let the earth hear the words I utter!
May my discourse come down as the rain,
My speech distill as the dew,

D'var Torah By: 
L’dor Vador—From Generation to Generation
Davar Acher By: 
Debra Sagan Massey

"Remembrance is the secret to redemption." These words of the Baal Shem Tov were etched in my mind from a young age.

A World of Words

Back at the Burning Bush, God commands Moses to return to Egypt, to go before Pharaoh and deliver God's message: "Let us go...to sacrifice to the Eternal our God" (Exodus 3:18).

D'var Torah By: 
Haazinu All Year Long
Davar Acher By: 
Marcus L. Burstein

The third verse of Haazinu may not be particularly noticeable to Reform Jews, but other branches of Judaism may readily recognize it.

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