Jewish Holidays

Learn about the Jewish holidays, their meanings, history, and rituals. 

Explore Upcoming Jewish Holidays

- 14 Shevat 5783 to 15 Shevat 5783

Tu BiShvat or the "New Year of the Trees" is Jewish Arbor Day. The holiday is observed on the 15th (tu) of the Hebrew month of Shvat. Scholars believe that originally Tu BiShvat was an agricultural festival, marking the emergence of spring.

Why Does the Jewish Calendar Change Every Year?

People often say: "The Jewish holidays are late this year" or "The Jewish holidays are early this year." In fact, the holidays never are early or late; they are always on time, according to the Jewish calendar. Unlike the Gregorian (civil) calendar, which is based on the sun (solar), the Jewish calendar is based primarily on the moon (lunar), with periodic adjustments made to account for the differences between the solar and lunar cycles.

Learn More Printable Calendar

Why Does the Jewish Calendar Change Every Year?

Why do Jewish holidays move around on the calendar? Why do we sometimes have Hanukkah on Thanksgiving? Find some answers and learn more about how the Jewish calendar works in this video featuring Joshua Mallett from BimBam.

Jewish holidays begin at sunset. Dates specified are for evenings, so the holiday extends from sunset on the noted date until dusk on the last day of the holiday.

What's New

Tu BiShvat - Nature’s Invitation to Grow

January 25, 2023
Tu BiShvat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees, is upon us. While it may not be the most celebrated new year in the Jewish tradition, there is a simple power to the holiday - the call for us to become attuned to nature and learn what it can teach us about personal growth.

New Year, Same Me: Finding the Diamond Within

December 15, 2022
As Jews, we have the opportunity to celebrate the New Year not once, but several times. The Jewish year has four different New Year celebrations: Rosh HaShanah, Passover, Tu BiShvat, and Elul. Many Jews also celebrate the Gregorian New Year in January. That means we get five opportunities every year to do an accounting of our soul (cheshbon hanefesh) and make resolutions for growth and betterment.

Sharing the Miracle of Jewish Joy

December 14, 2022
Conversations about Hanukkah are few and far between in our ancient texts; most of what the Talmud records about Hanukkah is within a few pages in the tractate called Shabbat. But, as is so often the case, those millennia-old words have grown in significance as we prepare for Hanukkah 5783.

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Congregation Beth Am photo at Pride March