Shabbat

Shabbat is the holiday that is central to Jewish Life, occurring every Friday at sunset to Saturday night.

Shabbat's Origins

When most people think of holidays, they think of annual celebrations, but in Judaism there is one holiday that occurs every week - the Sabbath. Known in Hebrew as Shabbat and in Yiddish as Shabbos, this holiday is central to Jewish Life. As the great Jewish writer, Ahad Ha-Am has observed: "More than the Jewish people has kept the Sabbath, the Sabbath has kept the Jewish people." The Sabbath truly has been a unifying force for Jews the world over.

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Girl covering her eyes while blessing the candles

Now Livestreaming!

Many Reform congregations Livestream Friday night and Saturday morning services, as well as holiday services. Find a congregation in these listings and check their website for more information.

3 Ways to Bring Shabbat Home

Shabbat is the Jewish holiday that comes each week. Its roots lie in the biblical story of creation when, in order to complete the work of creating the world, God rested on the seventh day

Vegan Challah

Lisa Dawn Angerame
Round challah symbolizes the cycle of the year and are traditional for Rosh HaShanah; challot are traditionally braided for Shabbat. Either way, the key to delicious challah is kneading the dough.

Find a Congregation Near You

Find connection, community, learning, and spirituality at a welcoming Reform congregation near you.

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Congregation Beth Am photo at Pride March

 

Shabbat Videos

Watch videos to learn how to say Shabbat blessings, shape challah, make chicken soup, and much more.

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What's New

Shabbat as Alternate Time, Especially During the Pandemic

July 8, 2020
Friday’s sunset could be no different than Thursday’s, a time marker notching off another day or another week, but Shabbat requires us to mark a more substantial difference, Regularity is key to keep track of our lives between other Jewish times and when days blur into each other.