Related Blog Posts on Sukkot

You’re Invited to Remember

Rabbi Lisa S. Greene
Growing up, I saw Yizkor as a mysterious event on Yom Kippur afternoon. The grownups would return to temple in the afternoon, while my sister and I stayed home. There was no explanation, just an understanding that this was a thing our parents and grandparents did, and we did not.

Temporary Structure, Perpetual Joy

Cantor Lauren Phillips Fogelman
Sukkot is known in Hebrew as Z’man Simchateinu – the time of our joy. It’s the happiest festival on the Jewish calendar, labeled as such because it represents a time for coming together to enjoy family, nature, and a bountiful harvest.

Sukkot Breads in Fall Colors

Rabbi Deborah R. Prinz
Decorate your Sukkot table with Ethiopian, North African, and Sephardi breads full of fall colors and tantalizing spice mixes while broadening your palate with the customs of worldwide Jewish communities. Laden with seasonal honey, pumpkin, or orange, they don’t need braiding and make perfect gifts.