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Israeli Recipes

Israeli Sweet Cheese 'Levivot'

By: 
Orly Ziv

While the term levivot technically refers to the potato pancakes so common at Hanukkah, this version with sweet cheese is a fun variation that's perfect for dessert. Serve it with sour cream or applesauce, depending on whether you feel like something more sweet or savory.

Ingredients: 
PANCAKES:
500 grams (16 ounces) quark or ricotta cheese
150 millileters (5 ounces) yogurt
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons raisins (optional)
2 tablespoons brandy
2 eggs
5 tablespoons flour
50 grams (2 ounces) butter
1/4 cup canola oil
Powdered sugar
................................................................
TOPPINGS:
Sour cream or applesauce
Directions: 
  1. Put the cheese, yogurt, sugar, vanilla extract, raisins (if using), brandy, eggs, and flour in a large bowl and mix until smooth.
  2. Let the mixture rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  3. Heat the butter and oil in a wide pan.
  4. For each pancake, spoon about 1/4 cup of batter into the hot pan. Work in batches so as not to crowd the pan. Fry on both sides until golden and crispy. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate.
  5. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve with sour cream or applesauce.

    Reprinted with permission from Cook in Israel: Home Cooking Inspiration by Orly Ziv. 

Choose from among these 18 recipes to add an Israeli twist to Independence Day – and to enjoy all summer long. 

Ethiopian Spiced Black Beans

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Presently only about 1% of the Israeli population are Beta Jews, Jews who were originally from Ethiopia.  No matter how small, the Beta Jews have had an impact on Israeli cuisine.  The following is a recipe I have adapted from Chef Marcus Samuelson to the delight of my guests.  Originally using black-eyed peas, I use the slightly sweeter, less earthy black beans for this dish.

Ingredients: 
12 ounces (approximately 2 cups) dried black beans, rinsed
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt to taste
1/4 cup coconut oil, dairy-free margarine or unsalted butter
1 medium-large red onion, finely chopped
1 1/2 tablespoons peeled ginger, finely chopped
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 habanero or serrano pepper, seeded and finely chopped
2 teaspoons berbere seasoning or 1/2 teaspoon cayenne, 1/2 teaspoon chipotle pepper, 1/2 teaspoon ginger, 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1 cup canned coconut milk, stirred in can to combine coconut solids with liquid
1 cup vegetable or chicken broth
1/3 cup chopped cilantro leaves
2 scallions, finely sliced crosswise
3 cups cooked rice, optional (see Tidbit below)
Directions: 
  1. Place rinsed beans in a 3-quart saucepan and cover with water. Bring pot to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours until firm but tender.  (This is total time with no need to soak overnight.) When beans are done add 1/2 teaspoon salt.  Drain before using in the recipe.
  2. Heat a large, 4-quart saucepan or Dutch oven for 20 seconds over high heat. Add the coconut oil or other fat and heat for another 10 seconds.  Add the onion, ginger, garlic, and pepper to the pot and sauté over medium high heat until softened and lightly golden. This should take about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the berbere or spices and the turmeric to the mixture and sauté until the mixture is fragrant -  about 2 minutes.
  4. Add the tomatoes and cook for another 5 to 7 minutes, stirring often until the tomatoes melt into the mixture.
  5. Add the coconut milk and broth of choice and bring to a simmer.  Cook for another 15 to 20 minutes or until the sauce has slightly thickened.
  6. Add the drained black beans and cook for another 10 minutes or until mixture is well combined.  At this point mixture can be refrigerated and reheated before serving. 
  7. When ready to serve, reheat and then gently stir in the chopped scallions and cilantro.
  8. Serve alone or with cooked rice.

Tina Wasserman is the author of Entrée to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora and Entrée to Judaism for Families and is a visiting lecturer and scholar-in-residence throughout the country. She serves on the boards of ARZA and URJ Camp Newman, and is a member of Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, TX. Her recipes can be found at Cooking and More and throughout ReformJudaism.org, where she serves as food editor. Tina can be reached for congregational and organizational events through her website.

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • Although rice is not normally an accompaniment, since this mixture is typically spicy, the rice will help cleanse the palate.
  • Like all good stews, the flavors meld better the longer they are combined.
  • 2,500 years ago Ethiopian Jews traditionally served black eyed peas for Rosh Hashanah to symbolize the “eye of God” watching over them.

Carnatzlach

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Carnatzlach (or karnatzlack) are delicious meatballs that look like little sausages without any casing.  They are kebabs when tightly squeezed onto a skewer. Carnat means fresh sausage in Romanian (probably from the Spanish “carne” meaning meat), and “lach” at the end of the word is the Yiddish word for little.

In 1492, when the Jews were expelled from Spain, the Sultan in Turkey invited them to come live in peace in his large Ottoman Empire.  Romania was a part of this empire for over 300 years.  The Sephardim brought their love for ground meat dishes and the Ottoman use of spices and grilling meats to Romania and Romanian Jews making aliyah to Israel have had an impact on the cuisine there as well.

Ingredients: 
1 tablespoon finely minced garlic (about 2 large cloves)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
15 grindings of fresh black pepper or ¼ teaspoon
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika
1/8 teaspoon allspice, optional
1/4 cup club soda
2 tablespoons finely minced fresh parsley
1 pound ground beef (or ½ beef and ½ veal), not too lean
Directions: 
  1. Mix the garlic, salt, pepper, cumin, paprika and allspice in a 2 quart glass mixing bowl.  Add the club soda to the spices.  Set aside for 5 minutes to blend the flavors.
  2. Add the parsley and the ground meat to the bowl and mix together using a fork and a soupspoon.  If you feel more comfortable using your hands to mix the ingredients, use your fingertips so meat won’t get tough.
  3. Wet your hands with a little water and then shape meat into 3 x 1 inch logs that are a little pointy on the ends (see Tidbit below). Do not make them too thin or they will fall apart.  Place on a plate.
  4. When ready to cook, either grill outside, in your oven under the broiler, or on a grill pan on the top of the stove. 
  5. Using long barbecue tongs and a metal spatula, turn the carnatzlach every 2 minutes or until all sides are browned. They should cook in 7-8 minutes, or less if you like them medium rare.

Tina Wasserman is the author of Entrée to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora and Entrée to Judaism for Families and is a visiting lecturer and scholar-in-residence throughout the country. She serves on the boards of ARZA and URJ Camp Newman, and is a member of Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, TX. Her recipes can be found at Cooking and More and throughout ReformJudaism.org, where she serves as food editor. Tina can be reached for congregational and organizational events through her website.

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • In Israel the seasoned meat is firmly pressed in 3 x 1 inch lengths onto a flat skewer and then grilled as kebabs.
  • Carnatzlach often contain large amounts of garlic. This recipe has a lot but you could add even more if young and old will enjoy it.
  • Be very careful if you grill the meat on the stove. The club soda will make the carnatzlach splatter more than usual when they get hot.

Laffa Bread

By: 
Tina Wasserman

Really easy to make and so delicious. You’ll hate buying this bread any more.

Ingredients: 
7 ½ cups bread flour
1 package Rapid Rise yeast
2 tablespoons sugar
½ tablespoon salt
3 cups water
¼ cup fragrant extra virgin olive oil (Tunisian, Greek or Italian)
Additional oil for greasing bowl and board
Directions: 
  1. Combine 7 cups of the flour, yeast, sugar and salt in a large mixing bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.
  2. Measure the water  in a large glass measuring cup and microwave for 1 minute and 35 seconds (or until it is around 120°F on an instant read thermometer).
  3. If using a mixer turn it on to #2 setting. Add the water and then add the oil. Stir until all liquid is incorporated.
  4. Add the remaining ½ cup flour and run the mixer for 6 minutes OR, place the ½ cup flour on your counter or a board and knead the flour into the dough until a smooth, soft, slightly sticky dough is formed.
  5. Grease a large bowl with 1 tablespoon olive oil.  Turn dough in bowl to coat with oil, cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm, draft-free spot (a turned off microwave oven is perfect for this, or a warming drawer (if you are lucky to have one).
  6. Let dough rise until doubled in size (about 1 hour). Punch down dough and cut into 12 pieces.  Dough is very soft and sticky so flour your hands well before shaping into balls.  Place dough balls on a greased cookie sheet and let rest while you get your board and pan ready.
  7. Heavily oil a large cutting board and heat a flat, non-stick griddle or ridged grill.
  8. Place a ball of dough on the oiled board and lightly pat the dough into a circle about 8 inches in diameter.  Don’t worry if it is not a perfect circle, it will stretch when placing it in the pan and gets torn apart while eating anyway.
  9. Cook dough on one side until lightly golden and edges look puffed and dry.  Flip dough over and cook for a few minutes until underside is done.  This should take only about 3-4 minutes total.
  10. Keep covered until all laffa is made.
  11. Serve with vegetables and Mediterranean dips, or fold over a filling and eat it like a sandwich.

Tina Wasserman is the author of Entrée to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora and Entrée to Judaism for Families and is a visiting lecturer and scholar-in-residence throughout the country. She serves on the boards of ARZA and URJ Camp Newman, and is a member of Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, TX. Her recipes can be found at Cooking and More and throughout ReformJudaism.org, where she serves as food editor. Tina can be reached for congregational and organizational events through her website.

Tina's Tidbits: 
  • The trick to making this bread is to pay attention to the words “heavily oil”.  Your board should be slippery with oil.
  • Laffa tastes just as fresh 2 days later if kept in a sealed plastic bag.  You can warm it in a microwave oven for 20 seconds but room temperature is just fine.
  • Never refrigerate baked goods, as they actually get stale faster.

 

 

Matboucha

By: 
Tina Wasserman

When I was researching eggplant recipes for my book, Entrée to Judaism, I was amazed to see the progression of recipes for smoked eggplant that evolved in Jewish communities around the Mediterranean. This recipe does not use eggplant but it does show the creativity of Middle Eastern and Israeli cooks to capitalize on the smoky flavor imparted into charred vegetables. 

You will find this dish, of Moroccan origin, on salitim (salad) tables throughout Israel. Serve with warm Laffa bread to sop up the juices.

Ingredients: 
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 large cloves of garlic, minced
3 red bell peppers smoked or one 12-15 oz. jar fire-roasted peppers
1 28-ounce can whole Marzano plum tomatoes, drained well, seeded, and diced
1 large jalapeño, seeded and finely diced
Kosher salt to taste
1 tablespoon additional extra virgin olive oil
½ tablespoon (1 ½ teaspoons) hot paprika
Sugar, optional if tomatoes aren’t sweet
Crushed red pepper flakes, optional for additional spiciness
Directions: 
  1. Heat a 3-quart saucepan over high heat for 15 seconds.  Add the 3 tablespoons olive oil and heat for another 15 seconds.  Reduce the heat to moderate.  Add the minced garlic and stir for 30 seconds until garlic has softened and flavored the oil.  Do not let garlic burn.
  2. Add the diced pepper, tomatoes, jalapeño and salt to the pan.  Cook, partially covered at a simmer for 45 minutes or until almost all of the liquid is gone and the mixture is thick and lumpy.  Stir often to prevent sticking.
  3. Combine the remaining olive oil and hot paprika and stir into the matboucha until it is fully blended.  Cook for an additional 10 minutes.
  4. Adjust taste with more salt and/or crushed pepper flakes or a little sugar.
  5. Serve warm or at room temperature with laffa, pita or crudité.

Note: Matboucha tastes even better the next day.  Refrigerate until ready to eat.


Tina Wasserman is the author of Entrée to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora and Entrée to Judaism for Families and is a visiting lecturer and scholar-in-residence throughout the country. She serves on the boards of ARZA and URJ Camp Newman, and is a member of Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, TX. Her recipes can be found at Cooking and More and throughout ReformJudaism.org, where she serves as food editor. Tina can be reached for congregational and organizational events through her website.

Ktzitzot: Israeli Chicken Patties

By: 
Amelia Saltsman

Pan-fried ground-meat patties — especially from poultry — are one of the most beloved Jewish Israeli comfort foods (the other is chicken schnitzel). The term comes from the verb “to grind”; choose whole parts and ask your butcher to grind them freshly for you.

Cookbook author and radio host Lynne Rosetto Kasper advises a mix of turkey and chicken for a richer, capon-like flavor. If you must use white meat, add a little olive oil to the meat mixture to prevent it from drying out.

Ingredients: 
1 egg
¼ cup (15 g) finely chopped fresh cilantro
3 tablespoons minced onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon ground turmeric
Freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons dry bread crumbs or cooked rice
1 pound (450 g) freshly ground chicken or turkey, or a mix
¼ cup (60 ml) olive or mild oil, such as safflower, sunflower, or grapeseed
Directions: 
  • In a medium bowl, lightly whisk the egg with a fork. Stir in the cilantro, onion, garlic, salt, paprika, cumin, turmeric, a few grinds of pepper, and the bread crumbs. Add the meat and mix gently but thoroughly. If you have time, chill the mixture for 1 hour or more.
     
  • Form the mixture into 10 to 12 patties, each about 3 inches (7.5 cm) in diameter. The patties may be made several hours ahead and refrigerated.
     
  • In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Working in batches to avoid crowding, add the patties and fry, turning once, until golden brown on both sides and cooked through, about 7 minutes total. Using a slotted spatula, transfer to paper towels to drain briefly. Repeat with the remaining patties. Serve hot.

​Reprinted with permission from The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen © 2015 by Amelia Saltsman, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Staci Valentine


Amelia Saltsman is the daughter of a Romanian mother and an Iraqi father who met in the Israeli army and immigrated to Los Angeles, where she was born and raised. Her cooking reflects her eclectic background, with the diverse flavors and cultural touchstones that have made her award-winning first book, The Santa Monica Farmers' Market Cookbook, a beloved classic. Amelia's name is synonymous with intuitive, seasonal cooking, and she is regularly sought out for her expertise by publications such as Bon AppétitCooking LightVegetarian TimesU.S. AirwaysFIt PregnancyThe Jewish Journal, and Los Angeles Times. She is a frequent guest on KCRW's "Good Food with Evan Kleiman" and a longtime advocate for small family farms. Amelia lives with her family in Santa Monica.

Spicy Matboucha

By: 
Amelia Saltsman

There are almost as many variations of and uses for the spicy tomato jam condiment known as salade cuite, or “cooked salad,” as there are people in Israel, Morocco, or Tunisia.

When my cousin Pazit married Moroccan Israeli soccer hero Avi Gabai, she learned from his sisters how to make all his favorite foods, including this version of matboucha. It adds zest to many a dish, including hummus, and is the foundation for that other Israeli-Tunisian-Moroccan favorite, the egg dish shakshuka. Be sure to try it with black-eyed peas.

Sauce tomatoes such as Roma, San Marzano, or Costoluto Genovese work best here. When good fresh tomatoes aren’t available, use canned crushed tomatoes instead.

This recipe can be easily doubled and freezes well.

Ingredients: 
2½ pounds (1.2 kg) meaty tomatoes, such as Roma, San Marzano, or Costoluto Genovese, or 1 can (28 ounces/800 g) crushed tomatoes
2 to 4 chiles, such as jalapeño or habanero or a mix, 2 to 4 ounces (55 to 115 g) total
8 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
1½ teaspoons hot paprika, or to taste
¼ cup (2 fl ounces/60 ml) grapeseed or other mild oil
Kosher or sea salt
Sugar
Directions: 
  • To peel the tomatoes, either use a swivel-blade vegetable peeler or immerse them in boiling water and slip off the skins. If you like, cut the tomatoes in half and squeeze them to remove the seeds. Skip this step if the seeds don’t bother you. Chop the tomatoes into ½- to 1-inch (12-mm to 2.5-cm) pieces. You should have 3¼ to 3½ cups (585 to 630 g) altogether. Place them in a wide pot or a deep sauté pan.
     
  • Mince the chiles and add them to the pan along with some or all of their seeds for added heat. Add the garlic, stir in the paprika, and pour the oil over all. Start cooking the mixture over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Once the mixture comes to a boil, reduce the heat as necessary to keep it bubbling without burning, and cook until very thick and glossy, about 1 hour. Use a splatter screen to keep your stove clean, if you like.
     
  • Remove from the heat and season to taste with salt and sugar, adding about 1 teaspoon of each. Let cool and transfer to 1 or 2 tightly capped jars. The condiment will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 week and in the freezer for up to 2 months.

Reprinted with permission from The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen © 2015 by Amelia Saltsman, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Staci Valentine


Amelia Saltsman is the daughter of a Romanian mother and an Iraqi father who met in the Israeli army and immigrated to Los Angeles, where she was born and raised. Her cooking reflects her eclectic background, with the diverse flavors and cultural touchstones that have made her award-winning first book, The Santa Monica Farmers' Market Cookbook, a beloved classic. Amelia's name is synonymous with intuitive, seasonal cooking, and she is regularly sought out for her expertise by publications such as Bon AppétitCooking LightVegetarian TimesU.S. AirwaysFIt PregnancyThe Jewish Journal, and Los Angeles Times. She is a frequent guest on KCRW's "Good Food with Evan Kleiman" and a longtime advocate for small family farms. Amelia lives with her family in Santa Monica.

Shakshuka

By: 
Amelia Saltsman

Moroccans, Tunisians, and Yemenites all claim this quick egg dish as their own. Great for brunch or supper, it’s the Israeli equivalent of huevos rancheros. Keep a supply of matboucha on hand, so you can whip up a hearty meal in minutes. The term shakshuka comes from either the Hebrew verb “to shake,” as one does to a pan over a hot stove, or from Arabic slang for a mixture or stew. Skip the labneh for a vegan version and feel free to add spinach or cooked lamb sausage to the pan before adding the eggs for other variations.

The foundation for this shakshuka recipe is the spicy tomato condiment called matboucha.

Ingredients: 
2 cups (640 g) matboucha (see recipe link above)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 eggs
Kosher or sea salt (optional)
Generous handful of chopped fresh Italian parsley
Labneh, homemade or store-bought
Thickly sliced country bread, toasted, or pita bread
Directions: 
  • In a 12-inch (30.5-cm) skillet, thin the Matboucha with water to the consistency of thick spaghetti sauce. Add the olive oil and set over medium heat. When the sauce is bubbling, reduce the heat to medium-low.
     
  • Using the back of a large spoon, make an indentation in the sauce at the 12 o’clock position. Crack an egg into the depression. Repeat with remaining eggs, spacing them evenly in the pan. Cook until the eggs are set to your liking, about 7 minutes for over easy. Cover the pan to hasten cooking, especially if you like your eggs more well-done.
     
  • Season the eggs with salt, if desired, and shower the parsley over all. Serve directly from the pan into shallow individual bowls, accompanied by labneh and bread or pita.

​Reprinted with permission from The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen © 2015 by Amelia Saltsman, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Staci Valentine


Amelia Saltsman is the daughter of a Romanian mother and an Iraqi father who met in the Israeli army and immigrated to Los Angeles, where she was born and raised. Her cooking reflects her eclectic background, with the diverse flavors and cultural touchstones that have made her award-winning first book, The Santa Monica Farmers' Market Cookbook, a beloved classic. Amelia's name is synonymous with intuitive, seasonal cooking, and she is regularly sought out for her expertise by publications such as Bon Appétit, Cooking Light, Vegetarian Times, U.S. Airways, FIt Pregnancy, The Jewish Journal, and Los Angeles Times. She is a frequent guest on KCRW's "Good Food with Evan Kleiman" and a longtime advocate for small family farms. Amelia lives with her family in Santa Monica.

Poppy Seed Cake with Blueberries and Labneh

By: 
Michael Solomonov

The earthy fruitiness of poppy seeds makes them shine in recipes both sweet and savory; they’re equally at home on top of a buttered bagel as in a sweet filling for hamentashen, the stuffed, three-cornered Purim cookie. This poppy seed cake is basically a madeleine batter - almond flour, egg whites, and butter. The butter is browned first to give it a bit more complexity and a nuttiness that complements the poppy seeds. The egg whites keep the cake nice and tender and lend a bit of crispness to the crust.

Labneh (or labaneh or labné) is yogurt that has been salted and drained to remove excess water. The result is a thick, tart, and creamy spread that’s similar in texture to Greek-style yogurt, but richer in flavor. The tradition of drained yogurt comes from the Levant, but Israelis adopted it wholeheartedly and use labneh in sauces, eat it instead of yogurt, and just smear it on bread with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkling of za’atar. Although kosher laws mean that labneh seldom appears on the Israeli dinner table (where meat is typically served), I use it often at Zahav. Pureed with tons of soft herbs and garlic, labneh is the base of the striking jade-green sauce for Zahav’s famous fried cauliflower. Labneh also works beautifully as a sauce for fish (amazing when mixed with amba, mango pickle). I love to use labneh in desserts because it mellows the sweetness.

Ingredients: 
10 tablespoons (1¼ sticks) unsalted butter
1/2 cup almond flour
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
5 large egg whites
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
3 tablespoons honey
1/4 cup poppy seeds
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
1 1/2 cups blueberries, for serving
1 cup labneh, for serving
Directions: 
  1. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, swirling frequently, until the foaming stops and the butter turns a rich brown color and smells nutty, about 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. Whisk the almond flour, all-purpose flour, and baking powder in a bowl.
  3. Combine the egg whites, confectioners’ sugar, and honey in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or use a hand mixer and a big bowl). Beat on medium speed until the mixture is smooth and thick, about 3 minutes. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture and fold in gently with a spatula until just combined. Whisk about 1/4 cup of the batter into the brown butter until well combined, and then fold the brown butter mixture into the batter. Add the poppy seeds and lemon zest and fold in gently until just combined. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to overnight.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350°F, with a rack in the middle. Line a 9-by-13 inch baking dish with oiled parchment.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared dish and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Let cool in the pan. You can turn it out of the pan before slicing and serving, topped with blueberries and labneh, or serve straight from the pan.

Yield: One 9-by-13-inch cake
 


Excerpted with permission from ZAHAV by Michael Solomonov. Copyright © 2015 by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Photography © 2015 by Mike Persico. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Chef Michael Solomonov was born in Israel and grew up in Pittsburgh. He and Steven Cook are the co-owners of CookNSolo Restaurants, home to some of Philadelphia's most distinctive culinary concepts, including Zahav, Federal Donuts, Abe Fisher, Dizengoff, Rooster Soup Co., and Goldie. They are a combined four-time James Beard Award Winners, including the 2016 "Best International Cookbook" and "Book of the Year" awards for their first cookbook, Zahav, and a 2011 "Best Chef Mid-Atlantic" win for Solomonov and who in May, was named the 2017 JBF's "Outstanding Chef".

Tina's Tidbits: 

Michael Solomov Introduces Labneh

  • Prepared labneh is available in Middle Eastern markets. Making it is simple: Add salt to taste to plain (not nonfat) yogurt, scoop it into a cheesecloth-lined colander, and set that over a bowl. Place the whole contraption in your refrigerator to drain overnight, and you’ll have labneh for breakfast.

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