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sacred texts

When is the last time you genuinely apologized to someone for something you did? What makes an apology worthwhile? What steps do people need to take in order for an apology to be sincere? Do you think Judaism’s “opinion” will agree with yours?

Jewish Food for Thought is a series of animations that distill Jewish teachings into a form that is accessible, e

In Pirkei Avot 6:6, we read that "The Torah is greater than the priesthood and than royalty, seeing that royalty is acquired through thirty virtues, the priesthood twenty-four, while the Torah is acquired through forty-eight virtues." Learn about one of the middot (in Hebrew a "middah") from the list of 48 provided in Pirkei Avot.

Jewish Food for Thought is a series of animations that distill Jewish teachings into a form that is accessible, e

At the time of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem, authorship of the tradition was in the hands of the learned elite.

The period between 586 BCE and 70 CE saw a flowering of Jewish writing that resulted in new kinds of literary production that set the tone for Midrash and Talmud that followed. In this session we will look at a few examples of this fascinating literature, including works from the Dead Sea Scrolls, and discuss what contemporary Jews can learn from both the texts themselves and the interpretive processes that developed in this crucial period.

Whenever someone begins a sentence with the words "Judaism says," my figurative hearing aid goes off. The sages teach "Turn It and turn it again, for everything is in it." We will turn to some Jewish texts that range from surprising to vexing to perplexing.

Originally known simply as Avot (literally, “fathers” or “ancestors”), Pirkei Avot is among the most well known of all writings in Rabbinic Judaism.

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