Vayeishev

וַיֵּשֶׁב
[Jacob] Settled

Genesis 37:1−40:23

When Is Vayeishev Read?

/ 23 Kislev 5783
/ 26 Kislev 5784
/ 20 Kislev 5785

Summary

  • Jacob is shown to favor his son Joseph, whom the other brothers resent. Joseph has dreams of grandeur. (Genesis 37:1-11)
  • After Joseph's brothers had gone to tend the flocks in Shechem, Jacob sends Joseph to report on them. The brothers decide against murdering Joseph but instead sell him into slavery. After he is shown Joseph's coat of many colors, which had been dipped in the blood of a kid, Jacob is led to believe that Joseph has been killed by a beast. (Genesis 37:12-35)
  • Tamar successively marries two of Judah's sons, each of whom dies. Judah does not permit her levirate marriage to his youngest son. She deceives Judah into impregnating her. (Genesis 38:1-30)
  • God is with Joseph in Egypt until the wife of his master, Potiphar, accuses him of rape, whereupon Joseph is imprisoned. (Genesis 39:1-40:23)

Ten Minutes of Torah: Vayeishev Commentary

A Solitary Mission

By: Rabbi Karyn D. Kedar

The story of Joseph is the story of a solitary man, driven, visioning, dreaming, ambitious, misunderstood, and the object of much disdain. It is the story of heroic and tenacious leadership. Many a contemporary leader can relate. Leadership by its very nature is a tug of war between one's desire to actualize a sense of destiny and striving to meet the immediate needs of others. Leaders feel that they are uniquely called upon to achieve something important. To be driven by dream and possibility is lonely work.

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Learn More About Parashat Vayeishev with BimBam

Parashat Vayeishev: Joseph and his Colorful Coat

Learn about Joseph and his Colorful Coat in this week's Torah portion. Enjoy this video and other with BimBam.

Enjoy Podcasts About Parashat Vayeishev

Listen to Rabbi Rick Jacobs discuss Parashat Vayeishev in these episodes of his podcast, On the Other Hand: Ten Minutes of Torah.

Under the Sky

Losing and Finding Connection

Making an Impact

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Rabbi Rick Jacobs